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Henry Red Cloud

CHESTERTOWN, Md. — Longtime Lakota Sioux businessman Henry Red Cloud will be presented this Friday with an honorary Doctor of Public Service from Washington College, located in Chestertown, Md. 

For almost two decades, Henry Red Cloud has worked to develop and share renewable energy technologies for Great Plains tribes to become energy independent, create jobs, and improve living standards for American Indians.

Born and raised on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Henry Red Cloud is a direct, fifth-generation descendant of Chief Red Cloud (Mahpiya Luta), one of the last Lakota war chiefs and one of the most well-known American Indians in history.  

Henry Red Cloud founded Lakota Solar Enterprises in 2004. The company employs tribal members who manufacture and install efficient solar air heating systems for Native American families living on reservations across the Great Plains.

Lakota Solar Enterprises has built and installed more than 1,200 solar heating systems that save low-income homeowners up to 30 percent on utility bills. In 2008, with support from the nonprofit Trees, Water & People, he opened the Red Cloud Renewable Energy Center.  American Indians from around the country visit the renewable energy center to receive hands-on training in renewable energy technology and sustainable building practices from fellow Native trainers.

Among his many honors are the Interstate Renewable Energy Council’s Annual Innovation Award, the World Energy Globe Award, the White House’s Champion of Change for Solar Deployment, and MIT’s Solve Fellowship.

Washington College’s annual spring semester Convocation begins at 3:30 p.m. at the Decker Theatre of the Gibson Center for the Arts and is open to the public.

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