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Federally recognized tribes can apply for the Department of the Interior’s 2022 Tribal Broadband Grant Program that helps federally recognized tribes to expand or develop their internet capabilities.

The purpose of the National Tribal Broadband Grant Program is to improve the quality of life, spur economic development and commercial activity, create opportunities for self-employment, enhance educational resources and remote learning opportunities, and meet emergency and law enforcement needs by bringing broadband services to Native American communities that lack them, according to the Interior’s press release. 

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Feasibility studies funded through the program can help tribes make informed decisions on installing or expanding broadband.

The Office of Indian Economic Development plans to fund about 15 to 27 grants that will range in value from $100,000 to $175,000 for a two-year project.

“Reliable, high-speed internet access in tribal communities enables many opportunities for education, employment, entrepreneurship, and social connection,” Assistant Secretary Bryan Newland said in a statement on Wednesday. “These elements are all critical to our goal of making sure that people have the opportunity to live safe, healthy and fulfilling lives in their Tribal communities.”

For more information about the grant program, application process, and eligibility, visit the National Tribal Broadband Grant information page on the Interior’s website.

For questions, contact Dennis Wilson, Grant Management Specialist for the Office of Indian Economic Development, at 505-917-3235 or [email protected].




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About The Author
Jenna Kunze
Author: Jenna KunzeEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Senior Reporter
Jenna Kunze is a staff reporter covering Indian health, the environment and breaking news for Native News Online. She is also the lead reporter on stories related to Indian boarding schools and repatriation. Her bylines have appeared in The Arctic Sounder, High Country News, Indian Country Today, Tribal Business News, Smithsonian Magazine, Elle and Anchorage Daily News. Kunze is based in New York.