fbpx
 
IAIA wants to see its students graduate on time.

SANTA FE, N.M. — At a time when tuition rates are rising, the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) announced on Wednesday a 10 percent reduction in tuition for the 2020-2021 academic year.

The reduction was made in light of the COVID-19 pandemic so that students may  continue their education towards an associate's or bachelor's degree.

“During these challenging times, promoting student success is essential so that our graduates can return home with the education and skill-sets to strengthen their Indigenous communities,” IAIA President Dr. Robert Martin said.

Studies have shown that students who complete their degree program in four years have a greater degree of career success than students who take five or more years to finish--and many students who don't complete their program in four years are less likely to receive their degree for a variety of reasons, according to an IAIA news release. 

Research also indicates that students are more likely to get better grades, improve their financial state (by getting into the workplace sooner), and provides more options for the student's immediate future -- by finishing on time, students have more life choices. 

The 10% reduction in tuition:

  • Current IAIA Full-time student tuition - $2,470/semester
  • Discounted rate for Academic Year 2020-2021 - $2,223/semester
  • Current hourly tuition rate - $206/hour
  • Discounted rate for Academic Year 2020-2021 - $185/hour
  • These costs also include all required textbooks.

The new rates will commence with the 2020-2021 Academic year, which begins August 17, 2020. There is no application needed to receive the decreased rate.

More Stories Like This

Leaders Respond to Federal Indian Boarding School Investigative Report, Call it 'Monumental'
Native News Weekly (May 15, 2022): D.C. Briefs
Native Bidaské (Spotlight) with Carlisle Indian School Project Leader Gwen Carr
Indigenous Women on Roe v. Wade
Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding Schools Bill Advocated for in Washington, D.C.

Do you appreciate a Native perspective on the news? 

For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.

Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $20 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.