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IAIA wants to see its students graduate on time.

SANTA FE, N.M. — At a time when tuition rates are rising, the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) announced on Wednesday a 10 percent reduction in tuition for the 2020-2021 academic year.

The reduction was made in light of the COVID-19 pandemic so that students may  continue their education towards an associate's or bachelor's degree.

“During these challenging times, promoting student success is essential so that our graduates can return home with the education and skill-sets to strengthen their Indigenous communities,” IAIA President Dr. Robert Martin said.

Studies have shown that students who complete their degree program in four years have a greater degree of career success than students who take five or more years to finish--and many students who don't complete their program in four years are less likely to receive their degree for a variety of reasons, according to an IAIA news release. 

Research also indicates that students are more likely to get better grades, improve their financial state (by getting into the workplace sooner), and provides more options for the student's immediate future -- by finishing on time, students have more life choices. 

The 10% reduction in tuition:

  • Current IAIA Full-time student tuition - $2,470/semester
  • Discounted rate for Academic Year 2020-2021 - $2,223/semester
  • Current hourly tuition rate - $206/hour
  • Discounted rate for Academic Year 2020-2021 - $185/hour
  • These costs also include all required textbooks.

The new rates will commence with the 2020-2021 Academic year, which begins August 17, 2020. There is no application needed to receive the decreased rate.

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