David CannonNotah Begay at the 2017 Dell Match Play.

Golf Digest reports Notah Begay III became emotional during a call yesterday that was supposed to be about the Golf Channel’s weekend lineup when he began to speak during the pleasantries.

Begay, who is Navajo with San Felipe and Isleta Pueblo roots, spoke candidly about concerns he has for family members during the COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) pandemic. Both the Navajo Nation and San Felipe Pueblo are hotspots for the deadly virus.

Golf Digest writes:

Pleasantries were exchanged, and Notah Begay III began to speak. And then the former Stanford and PGA Tour player couldn’t get the words out. He was crying, caught off-guard by his own powerful emotions.

“I haven’t gotten emotional about this thing until now,” Begay said. “It’s tough for me to deal with … I apologize. I really do. It’s just a scary thing for me. It’s been a scary process.”

Begay is the only full-blooded American Indian to have played on the PGA Tour. Born and raised in Albuquerque, Begay secured a scholarship to Stanford University where he earned a degree in Economics in addition to earning All-American Honors three times and leading the golf team to a National Championship in 1994. It was at Stanford University where he met Tiger Woods. They have been friends since.

In addition to winning 4 PGA Tour tournaments, Mr. Begay became only the third player in the history of professional golf to shoot 59 in a professional event and partnered with good friend Woods in the 2000 President’s Cup.

Begay began a new career as a golf commentator in 2013. He has worked for NBC Sports and is now a commentator on the Golf Channel.

On an ongoing basis, Begay dedicates his time to positively impacting the Native American community. In 2005, he launched The Notah Begay III (NB3) Foundation. The Foundation works to battle obesity and diabetes in Native American youth. Additionally, Begay owns a golf course development firm and works exclusively with Native communities to develop world-class golf properties.

Begay says 75 percent of his family lives on the Navajo Indian Reservation.

“I’m going to lose some family members; I’m quite certain of it,” he said.

CLICK HERE to read the entire Golf Digest story.

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Author: Native News Online Staff