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WASHINGTON — Hundreds of mourners stood in the plaza outside the U.S. Supreme Court in the nation’s capital on Friday evening after they heard the news of the passing of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who passed away on Friday from metastatic cancer of the pancreas.

The mourners—of all ages—came to pay tribute to Justice Ginsburg, who was a strong supporter of women’s rights and civil rights. She served on the Supreme Court from 1993 until her death yesterday.

Since her passing, the four members in Congress who are tribal citizens issued statement commemorating her 27 years on the nation’s highest court.

Rep. Tom Cole (OK-04), Chickasaw Nation

“America has lost a remarkable icon and tenacious legal mind with the passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Justice Ginsburg devoted her life’s work to study and understanding of the law, and she fought for what she believed was right and just. Whether you agreed with her legal opinions or not, she was admired across the political divide. My sincerest thoughts and prayers are with Justice Ginsburg’s family, friends and many loved ones as they mourn this heavy and difficult loss.”

Rep. Sharice Davids (KS-03), Ho-Chunk Nation

“The loss of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is an immense one. She was a tireless champion for justice and a fierce advocate for the rights of all people under the law. My thoughts are with her family and I join people across the nation in mourning her passing,”

Rep. Deb Haaland (NM-01), Laguna Pueblo

“Ruth Bader Ginsburg's passing is an incalculable and devastating loss in the fight for justice and equality for all. Justice Ginsburg inspired so many young girls to dream big and opened the doors of opportunity to countless women in the legal profession. Her brilliance and light was a force in the courtroom and on the bench. Her legacy will live on through the millions of people whose lives became better because of her life's work. 

“I’m sending my prayers to her family and the country as we mourn together.”

Rep. Markwayne Mullin (OK-02), Cherokee Nation

“My prayers are with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s family during this difficult time. Even though our politics may have differed, as the second woman on the Supreme Court, she was a trailblazer and a fighter. May she rest in peace.”

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About The Author
Levi Rickert
Author: Levi RickertEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Levi "Calm Before the Storm" Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) is the founder, publisher and editor of Native News Online. Rickert was awarded Best Column 2021 Native Media Award for the print/online category by the Native American Journalists Association. He serves on the advisory board of the Multicultural Media Correspondents Association. He can be reached at [email protected].