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Most people in the United States will gain an hour of sleep overnight as Standard Time returns officially as 2:00 a.m. local time.

Turn your clocks back one hour before you go to bed tonight.

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The time change will allow the sun to come up and go down earlier during the remainder of fall and during the winter months.

Most of Arizona and Hawaii do not participate in the time shift, so this change will not impact them.

The time change has been happening for decades. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 gave the country its current start and stop dates for daylight saving time. It starts on the second Sunday in March and ends the first Sunday in November. 

While some people don’t like the change in time twice per year,  daylight saving time gives the United States about 7.5 months of daylight saving time and 4.5 months of standard time.

Fire departments across the United States remind us this is a great time to change batteries in our smoke detectors, which should be tested monthly.

We will lose our extra hour of sleep on Sunday, March 13, 2022, when we "spring forward" back to Daylight Saving Time. 

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