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WASHINGTON — The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) announced Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, will address the organization’s 2021 Executive Council Winter Session on Tuesday morning, Feb. 21.

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the winter session is being held virtually from Washington, D.C.

Dr. Fauci is one of America’s most trusted and accomplished scientific voices, a world-renowned physician-scientist who has served as Director of NIAID since 1984. He has advised seven presidents on HIV/AIDS and many other domestic and global health issues. He was one of the principal architects of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), a program that has saved millions of lives throughout the developing world.

As part of the new administration, he now also serves as Chief Medical Adviser on COVID-19 to President Biden.

Also addressing the winter session will be Senate Majority Leader Charles E. Schumer (NY), Sen. Brian Schatz (HI), chairman, Senate Committee on Indian Affairs and Sen. Lisa Murkowski (AK), Vice-Chair, Senate Committee on Indian Affairs.

Founded in 1994, the National Congress of American Indians is the largest and most representative American Indian and Alaska Native organization serving the broad interests of tribal governments and communities.

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