CRAZY HORSE, S.D. — The staff of the Crazy Horse Memorial found a unique way to pay homage to those serving in essential and front-line jobs during the coronavirus pandemic.  

Crazy Horse Memorial staff produced a series of laser images projected onto the mountain carving titled “Honoring the World’s Workers.”

Each night, rotating images appear. The images include a variety of individuals, from first responders to healthcare workers. 

Last week. Crazy Horse Memorial announced that it is officially reopening to the public next Monday, May 18.

The memorial will reopen with restrictions in place to protect the health of staff and guests. These include physical distancing, sanitizing all hard surfaces, heightened frequency of cleaning, practicing good hygiene, and other necessary protocols.

Photographs courtesy of the Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation

Staff members who must manage the new safety protocols are receiving appropriate training, and upper-level university students serving as interns must adhere to the new protocols as well.

In addition, the Laughing Water Restaurant, Snack Shop, Gift Shop, and Bus to Base services also will be available to guests starting May 18, with proper safety, cleaning, and social distancing measures implemented. Korczak’s Heritage Inc. provides these services, with royalties paid to the Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation. 

To learn more about Crazy Horse Memorial, to plan a visit, and for information about making a contribution, call (605) 673-4681 or visit crazyhorsememorial.org

 

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Author: Native News Online Staff