fbpx
 

TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — The Cherokee National History Museum is sharing the story of the first Cherokee Christmas in a new exhibit at the Cherokee National History Museum until Jan. 2, 2021.

The first Cherokee Christmas took place in 1805 when Moravian missionaries were invited by Cherokee James Vann to his home in Georgia. The home was decorated with natural materials and beeswax candles. Moravian stars were made out of paper and scriptures were written on scrolls to decorate the first Christmas tree in Cherokee Nation.

The special Christmas exhibit showcases not only how those Cherokee traditions began, but also shows how quickly they grew in popularity. In just a few years, the Christmas celebration at the Vann home hosted hundreds and featured singing, prayers and Bible readings in both English and Cherokee.

As part of the Christmas exhibit, the museum will host a special segment of Exploring Cherokee History, featuring an interview with the interpreter at the historic Vann home in Georgia.

The Cherokee National History Museum is located in one of the tribe’s most iconic structures, the Cherokee National Capitol building. It housed Cherokee Nation’s executive, legislative and judicial offices until 1906 and was most recently home to the Cherokee Nation Supreme Court until fall 2018.

 

The Cherokee National Museum at Christmas. Courtesy photograph

The Cherokee National History Museum opened in 2019 and shares the history and culture of the Cherokee Nation within 4,000 square feet of permanent exhibit space that features Cherokee lifestyle from pre-European contact through the Trail of Tears and the revitalization of the tribe after the American Civil War. It is located at 101 S. Muskogee Ave.

Cherokee Nation museums are open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For information on Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism, including museum operations, please call (877) 779-6977 or visit www.VisitCherokeeNation.com.

More Stories Like This

Eliot Neal Named New Missing or Murdered Indigenous Person Assistant United States Attorney for the Southwest Regions
Native News Weekly (October 1, 2023): D.C. Briefs
Geoffrey Blackwell Named NCAI's General Council and Chief of Staff
Assemblymember James C. Ramos Remembers Sen. Feinstein's Commitment to Sacred Sites
Federal Shutdown Averted Through a Stopgap Bill

Stand with us in championing Indigenous journalism that makes a difference. Your support matters.

Support our Indigenous-led newsroom as we shed light on critical issues, such as the painful history of Indian Boarding Schools. To date, we've published nearly 200 stories dedicated to this important topic, providing insights and awareness to a global audience. Our news is freely accessible to all, but its production demands resources. That's why we're reaching out to you this month for your generous contribution.

For those who commit to a recurring donation of $12 per month or more, or make a one-time donation of $150 or greater, we're excited to offer you a copy of our upcoming Indian Boarding School publication. Additionally, you will be added to our Founder's Circle. Together, we can ensure that these vital stories continue to be told, shared, and remembered.

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Native News Online is one of the most-read publications covering Indian Country and the news that matters to American Indians, Alaska Natives and other Indigenous people. Reach out to us at [email protected].