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From Press Releases

BAY MILLS , Mich. — On March 10, Bay Mills Indian Community became aware that two of our employees might have been exposed to novel coronavirus (COVID-19) while on out-of-state travel to the Washington, D.C. area. Those employees reported the exposure immediately and took appropriate steps to distance themselves from others in the community.

Tribal administration immediately reached out to community members, making them aware of the situation and the actions being taken. As of this evening, Friday, March 13, BMIC is happy to report the results of the individual being tested has come back negative. Bay Mills staff has been cleared of exposure to the virus.

BMIC will continue to be proactive during this time and has taken measures to allow some staff to work from home, temporarily closed some tribal operations, and established a community network to help those who need it most during this crisis.

Anyone who is sick is encouraged to stay home. The most effective method of slowing the spread of this virus is social distancing.

If you are experiencing symptoms of the novel coronavirus, please contact your health provider by phone and notify them of symptoms before visiting a doctor’s office.

For resources related to the coronavirus, please visit:

• https://www.michigan.gov/coronavirus • https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html • https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus

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