fbpx
 

MINOT, N.D. — A member of the Three Affiliated Tribes (Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara) was chosen by the North Dakota Associated Press Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association (NDAPSSA) as both athlete of the year and North Dakota’s Mr. Basketball. Jesse White, 18, of White Shield, N.D. is Arikara and was the lone Native student athlete to be considered for Mr. Basketball among five finalists.

“It’s a great blessing, it feels good,” White told Native News Online. “This is definitely for my family, for my people from my reservation. This is to show any kids from any reservation that if you put your mind to anything you can do it.” 

Mr. Basketball is awarded annually to the state's top high school senior, according to NDAPSSA’s website. 

White finished second on the all-time scoring list for North Dakota prep boys basketball history with 2,768 points, according to The Bismarck Tribune. He has been clocking varsity team minutes since the 7th grade. This past season, he averaged 28 points per game, according to NDAPSSA. 

White’s school, White Shield High School, has an enrollment of 38 students, making it one of the smallest schools in the state. Because enrollment is so small, players like White often get overlooked by the media and schools seeking talent. 

As for what’s next, White is definitely going to pursue college basketball, but hasn’t committed yet. “I want to make the best decision for me,” he said. 

“I think about Jesse, our little Inanni (brother) just six years ago when he made his varsity debut as a 7th grader and him making sports history is amazing,” said White’s older sister Dawn White to Native News Online. “As a family we are so proud of his accomplishments and warrior spirit day in and day out.” 

 

Dawn added: “We know he will continue to keep achieving his goals and dreams.” 

More Stories Like This

Michigan Governor Appoints 1st Native Citizen to Court of Appeals
Michigan Governor Meets with State's Tribes
Manitoba Man Charged with Killing 3 More Indigenous Women, House of Commons Rejects State of Emergency Request
SEEN & HEARD at the White House Tribal Nations Summit
Native News Weekly (December 4, 2022): D.C. Briefs

Do you appreciate a Native perspective on the news? 

For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.

Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $25 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Author: Darren ThompsonEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Darren Thompson (Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe) is a staff reporter for Native News Online who is based in the Twin Cities of Minnesota. Thompson has reported on political unrest, tribal sovereignty, and Indigenous issues for the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, Indian Country Today, Native News Online, Powwows.com and Unicorn Riot. He has contributed to the New York Times, the Washington Post, and Voice of America on various Indigenous issues in international conversation. He has a bachelor’s degree in Criminology & Law Studies from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.