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Here's a round-up of business news involving tribes and Native-owned businesses including the maker of the popular TANKA Bar, the law firm that helped win the McGirt case, a California tribe that wants to build a prison on its reservation, an Alaska Native Corporation board member who was fined for a Facebook post, and more.   

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NEW BUFFALO, Mich. — Sports betting is now live at the three tribally owned Four Winds Casinos in Southwest Michigan.

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GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. — About three dozen non-gaming business entities owned and managed by Michigan tribes generated more than a quarter-billion dollars in economic impact across the state last year, according to a new study.

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GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. — Native News Online announced today that Kyle Edwards has joined the staff as its first-ever managing editor. The hire is part of the publication’s broader initiative to expand its coverage of Indian Country and build its audience of Native and non-Native readers.

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HERNDON, Va. — The Alaska Native Corporation NANA has announced that one of its federal contracting subsidiaries has been awarded a $7 million contract from the U.S. Department of Energy.

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WASHINGTON — If the old adage “money talks” proves true, then the conversation about changing a racist team name just got a whole lot louder for Washington’s National Football League (NFL) team.

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As a result of the exclusive agreement, Roar Digital will open a BetMGM Sportsbook later this year at Spirit Mountain Casino, the largest casino in Oregon located about 65 miles from Portland. In addition to retail sports betting, the company also will offer an on-reservation mobile sportsbook app and plans to make the system available statewide when allowed by regulators, according to a statement. 

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The business investment arm of the Navajo Nation reportedly is taking another run at acquiring the assets of legacy firearms manufacturer Remington Arms Co.

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CHOCTAW, Miss. — A process that started off with identifying ways to encourage youth members of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians to get more interested in STEM education eventually led to a new business strategy for the tribe.