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HOLLYWOOD — The creator and cast from Reservation Dogs, the summer’s hottest Indigenous series, had a message for millions of Emmy Awards viewers last night: it’s time for Hollywood to be more inclusive.

On stage to present the Emmy for Outstanding Directing in a Limited Series, series co-creator Sterlin Harjo (Muscogee Creek) and actors Paulina Alexis (Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation), D’Pharaoh Woon-A-Tai (Oji-Cree), Kawennahere Devery Jacobs (Kanienʼkehá꞉ka), and Lane Factor (Creek-Seminole/Caddo) discussed the state of Indigenous people in the industry. 

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"We are here on television's biggest night as creators and actors, proud to be Indigenous people working in Hollywood, representing the first people to walk upon this continent, and we are really happy to be here," Harjo said. 

D'Pharaoh continued, "Thankfully, networks and streamers are now—now—beginning to produce and develop shows created by and starring Indigenous people."

Devery added, "It's a good start, which can lead us to the day when telling stories from underserved communities will be the norm, not the exception."

Finally, Paulina concluded, "Because, like life, TV is at its best when we all have a voice."

National Indian Gaming Association Chairman Ernest Stevens, Jr. posted on his Facebook page: “NATIVE AMERICA is Loud & Proud at the EMMYS tonight.”

South Dakota state Sen. Red Dawn Foster posted on her Facebook page: “Makes my heart so happy."

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