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DOUGLAS, Mich. — American Indian drumming could be heard a couple of blocks away from the Saugatuck-Douglas History Center on a beautiful West Michigan summer Saturday afternoon in the small village of Douglas, Mich., an art community located 40 miles southwest of Grand Rapids.

The Iron Bear drum was on hand for the “Creative Spark - Celebration of the Bodewadmi (Potawatomi) Tribe” program. Several dancers were also present to demonstrate their skills as traditional dancers before a mostly non-Native audience who came out Saturday to learn about the Potawatomi culture.

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Emcee Jason Wesaw (Pokagon Potawatomi) told the audience to observe how the dancers put their feet down gently as they danced. 

“See how the dancers flow with the beat of the drum leaving their gentle footprints on Mother Earth,” Wesaw said.

Visitors to the event were able to purchase Indian tacos and fry breard. They also were able to see some Potawatomi artisans who were present to demonstrate their traditional art techniques. 

 

Jason Wesaw emceed the event. (Photo/Levi Rickert)

 

Jonathan Rinehart carried in the eagle staff. (Photo/Levi Rickert)

 

Morgan Raphael demonstrated her skills as a fancy dancer. (Photo/Levi Rickert)

 

The audience was invited to dance with the Native dancers. (Photo/Levi Rickert)

 

Award-winning sculptor Jason Quigno discusses his art with community members. (Photo/Levi Rickert)

 

John Pigeon demonstrates his traditional basket weaving talents using black ash. (Photo/Levi Rickert)

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About The Author
Levi Rickert
Author: Levi RickertEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Levi "Calm Before the Storm" Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) is the founder, publisher and editor of Native News Online. Rickert was awarded Best Column 2021 Native Media Award for the print/online category by the Native American Journalists Association. He serves on the advisory board of the Multicultural Media Correspondents Association. He can be reached at [email protected].