fbpx
 
Chief Black Coal of the Northern Arapaho.CREDIT JOHN K. HILLERS/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

RIVERTON, Wyo. — The Northern Arapaho Tribe will hold a celebration on Saturday, February 1st at the Great Plains Hall at Arapahoe to welcome home the headdress of Chief Black Coal, according to the Tribe’s Facebook page.  

One of the most influential Arapaho leaders of the 19th century, Chief Black Coal’s 140-year old headdress is being donated by a Massachusetts family.  

Wyoming Public Media has the story of how the headdress made its way home to the Northern Arapaho nation, as well as other recent victories for the Northern Arapaho Tribal Historic Preservation Office. In 2014, then-director Yufna Soldier Wolf led the charge in repatriating the remains of two Arapaho boys who died at a government boarding school in the late 1800s. Devin Oldman succeeded last year in bringing a small herd of buffalo to Northern Arapaho land for the first time in 130 years, according to the Wyomning Public Media report. 

More Stories Like This

‘Dark Winds’ Hears Critics: Director says TV series will ‘Course-Correct’ for Accuracy
Assembly of First Nations to Host Worldwide Premiere of The Doctrine of Recovery
Vision Maker Media Grants Awards
‘Dark Winds’ Fails Authenticity Test
Twelve Native Writers Received the Native American Writers Accelerator Grant

Do you appreciate a Native perspective on the news? 

For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.

Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $20 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.