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SANTA FE — The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) will reopen September 16 after closing earlier this year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The museum is reopening in compliance with New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham’s approval.

The MoCNA will reopen at 25 percent capacity—40 individuals—at any given time, according to museum officials.

On Sept. 16, the MoCNA will be open from 12 noon – 5 p.m. Following its reopening, the hours of operation will be Wednesday – Sundays, 12 noon – 5 p.m. Timed tickets will be available for purchase online at iaia.edu/store or in-person at the MoCNA museum store.

The MoCNA released the following protocols it will follow to help to keep its staff and visitors safe and healthy.  

A Few Protocols to Ensure a Safe Visitor Experience

  • Please self-assess before visiting the museum. Are you exhibiting any symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, difficulty breathing, headache, body aches, sore throat, loss of taste and smell, fever, and chills)? Have you been in contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19? If you are exhibiting any of these symptoms or have been exposed, please do not visit the museum and reschedule for a later date. If you purchased a ticket online, we will work with you on transferring that ticket to another date or providing you with a refund.
  • Respect social distancing and ensure everyone's safety by following all signage and directional arrows within each of our gallery spaces. Please respect our max occupancy signs for each gallery space and please maintain a 6-foot distance or more from other museum guests and staff.
  • Following New Mexico's public health order and IAIA's guiding principles, all visitors will be required to wear a face covering that covers the nose and mouth while in the museum.
  • Hand sanitizing stations have been placed throughout the museum for your convenience.
  • At the moment, no docent-led group tours or school tours will be provided.
  • Please be respectful of our staff and each other. We are here to ensure a safe space for everyone

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