fbpx
facebook app symbol  twitter  linkedin  instagram 1
 

From the release of the first episode, Indian Country knew FX’s groundbreaking series “Reservation Dogs” was a special television series. At last there was television that depicted lives of contemporary Native Americans on screen navigating life in rural Indian Country.

The hard work of “Reservation Dogs” creator Sterlin Harjo (Seminole/Muscogee) and all of the other talented Native American writers, actors. and production crew who worked on the series has paid off. 

A week after the finale of series was released on September 26, 2023, Hollywood Reporter critics on Thursday named “Reservation Dogs” its No.6 pick on the best television shows of the 21st century (so far). 

"There has never been a collection of stories quite like Sterlin Harjo’s Reservation Dogs," the "Hollywood Reporter" writes.

The series followed the lives of four Native American teenagers living in rural Oklahoma, first premiered in 2021 and was an immediate hit among critics and audiences alike. 

This is what the Hollywood Reporter said about “Reservation Dogs”:

There has never been a collection of stories quite like Sterlin Harjo’s Reservation Dogs. It’s not merely that Indigenous teen characters are a demographic rarely depicted on television, though they are; nor is it just that their plotlines here shrug off centuries of stereotypes about Native Americans, though they do. It’s the way these tales are told, with boundless curiosity and a freewheeling sense of experimentation.

The show allows for oddball visitors from the spirit plane, ventures with equal confidence into the boozy pleasures of a work conference and the painful history of Indian boarding schools, sets joy beside grief and mingles the mundane with the magical. Any single episode might put you in stitches over the obliviousness of a would-be influencer or in tears over the collection of departed ancestors watching over our characters in the here and now. Collectively, they build a world that feels as lived-in and as distinctive as any home.

More Stories Like This

Auntie J’s Journey: Overcoming Addiction and Inspiring Community on TikTok
Here's What's Going On in Indian Country July 19 - July 21
Festival Celebrates Mvskoke Culture and People
McSwain Theatre Celebrates 15 Years Under Chickasaw Nation Leadership
CRYP's RedCan Painting & Activities Move to Waniyetu Wowapi Art Park

Join us in observing 100 years of Native American citizenship. On June 2, 1924, President Calvin Coolidge signed the Indian Citizenship Act, granting Native Americans US citizenship, a pivotal moment in their quest for equality. This year marks its centennial, inspiring our special project, "Heritage Unbound: Native American Citizenship at 100," observing their journey with stories of resilience, struggle, and triumph. Your donations fuel initiatives like these, ensuring our coverage and projects honoring Native American heritage thrive. Your donations fuel initiatives like these, ensuring our coverage and projects honoring Native American heritage thrive.

About The Author
Levi Rickert
Author: Levi RickertEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Levi "Calm Before the Storm" Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) is the founder, publisher and editor of Native News Online. Rickert was awarded Best Column 2021 Native Media Award for the print/online category by the Native American Journalists Association. He serves on the advisory board of the Multicultural Media Correspondents Association. He can be reached at [email protected].