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SANTA FE, N.M. — The Southwestern Association for Indian Arts (SWAIA) announced on Friday that the 99th Santa Fe Indian Market will be held in-person—and online—on Saturday, August 21, and Sunday, August 22, 2021. 

This is exciting news to Native American artists who were disappointed last year because the in-person art market was canceled due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

SWAIA leaders feel the hybrid approach this year is the best option so that New Mexico Department of Health Covid-safe practices can be implemented, as the nation continues to recover from Covid-19.

“The health and safety of our artists, Indian Market guests, and local community remain our priority and concern. We are excited to innovate safe and creative solutions in presenting the 99th Indian Market,” SWAIA said in a news release on Friday.

According to the news release, SWAIA will adhere to any changes made by New Mexico state regulations.

The Santa Fe Indian Market is promoted as the largest and most prestigious juried Native arts show in the world and the largest cultural event in the southwest. The event brings in more than 150,000 visitors into Santa Fe from around the globe.

The Indian Market allows for a great opportunity for buyers to meet some of the most talented artisans from Indian Country. These artisans are quick to tell the story behind creations that are inspired from their own personal experiences, family influences and rich American Indian heritage.

CLICK to see SWAIA’s online April programming that features diverse and sculpture Native American artisans.

SWAIA’s online exhibition, called Living Art: A Snapshot of the IAIA Collections, is launching Thursday, April 22, 2021.
 

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