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WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. The number of new COVID-19 cases reported on Sunday evening rose by 33 on the Navajo Nation from Saturday's number to a total of 354 number of people testing positive.

There as one more confirmed COVID-19 related death on the Navajo Nation, which brings the total deaths to 14. The majority of those who have lost their lives are those older than 60-year-old.

The hotspot on the Navajo Nation is Navajo County, Ariz., which reports 149 confirmed positive cases of the deadly virus.

The 354 confirmed positive cases include the following counties:

Navajo County, AZ: 149 Apache County, AZ: 33 Coconino County, AZ: 94 McKinley County, NM: 17 San Juan County, NM: 45 Cibola County, NM: 7 San Juan County, UT: 7 Socorro County, NM: 2

During a live online town hall on Sunday, Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez continued to urge the general public to use protective masks, including homemade masks, and protective gloves in public to help prevent the spread of the virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also issued similar recommendations.

“You may be young and healthy, but please be mindful of your elders – your parents and grandparents. Their immune system may not be as strong as yours and they need to be protected. Projections indicate that we have not reached the peak of the spread of COVID-19, so please take every precaution and stay home as much as possible,” Nez said.

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez speaking during town hall on Sunday afternoon. Phoro from livestream.

At the conclusion of his opening statement, President Nez encouraged Navajo Nation citizens to pray and fast. He said he was beginning a 24-hour fast on Sunday.

The Navajo Police continue to issue citations and fines for individuals who violate the Navajo Nation’s “Stay at Home Order” and daily curfew that requires all residents to be home between 8:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. Navajo Police Chief Phillip B. Francisco stated that police are also setting up checkpoints on roadways to further enforce the orders, check essential work documentation, and direct those who are not on essential travel to return home.

The Navajo Nation’s daily curfew remains in effect from 8:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. The curfew does not apply to essential employees reporting to or from duty, with official identification and/or a letter of designation from their essential business employer on official letterhead which includes a contact for verification.

For more information including reports, helpful prevention tips, and more resources, please visit the Navajo Department of Health’s COVID-19 website at http://www.ndoh.navajo-nsn.gov/COVID-19. To contact the main Navajo Health Command Operations Center, please call (928) 871-7014.

For up to date information on impact the coronavirus pandemic is having in the United States and around the world go to: https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/us/?fbclid=IwAR1vxfcHfMBnmTFm6hBICQcdbV5aRnMimeP3hVYHdlxJtFWdKF80VV8iHgE

For up-to-date information about COVID-19, Native News Online encourages you to go to Indian Health Service’s COVID-19 webpage and review CDC’s COVID-19 webpage. 

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Levi Rickert
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Levi Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) is the founder, publisher and editor of Native News Online. He can be reached at [email protected]