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YAKAMA NATION RESERVATION — On Monday, the Yakama Nation Tribal Council Executive Committee issued a “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order for all residents of the Yakama Reservation and off-Reservation trust allotments due to the continued spread of the Coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic.

The “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order was issued pursuant to the Yakama Nation’s March 13, 2020 declaration of emergency. 

The Yakama Nation’s “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order only allows residents to leave their homes for necessities, or if they are critical employees for a tribal, federal, state, or local government, or for an exempted industry.

“Now is the time for dramatic action to protect our communities from this coronavirus. All residents must stay in their homes until further notice, unless you need essential items like food, gas, or medical services,” Yakama Nation Tribal Council Chairman Delano Saluskin said.

“This order carries the weight of Yakama law, and must be followed by all Yakama Reservation and off-Reservation trust allotment residents, regardless of whether you are Indian or non-Indian.” 

This order will be enforced by Yakama Nation Police, and violators may be subject to civil and/or criminal penalties. The Yakama Nation Coronavirus Response Team continues to work with our federal, state, and local partners to track and contain the spread of Coronavirus COVID-19.

For general information, please call the Yakama Nation’s Coronavirus COVID-19 Hotline at (509) 865-7272 for a prerecorded message with updates on the Yakama Nation’s response. This announcement will be updated as the situation changes.

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