fbpx
facebook app symbol  twitter  linkedin  instagram 1
 

 BIG HORN COUNTY, Mont. — A Red Flag warning remains in effect until Sunday evening due to the 78 square mile Sarpy Fire that has burned grass and ponderosa pine on the Crow and Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservations in Montana.

The fire is zero percent contained as of Friday night. And, fortunately there have been no human injuries reported as of Friday.

Authorities are concerned the fire may spread on the Labor Day weekend due to the high winds from a dry cold front passing through the area, coupled with triple digit temperatures and single digit humidity.

The fire that went out of control due to high winds on Wednesday has destroyed 27,000 acres on the Crow Indian Reservation and roughly 20,000 acres on the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation. Additionally, the fire has burned on state and federal land north of the Northern Cheyenne Reservation.

“We don’t need another spark this weekend!” said Randy Pretty On Top, fuels specialist at the Crow Nation.

A unified command of Crow Agency and Northern Cheyenne Bureau of Indian Affairs, Big Horn County Rural Fire, Northern Cheyenne Tribe agencies, and local ranchers are tackling this incident. “It’s an all-out effort by everybody,” said regional fuels specialist Bob Jones.

The fire is being fought with two SEATs (single-engine air tankers), and one heavy, one medium, and two light helicopters which are busy ferrying retardant and water onto edges of the 78 square mile burned area.

Engines remained at the fire overnight for expected activity into Saturday morning.

Additionally, ten engines and two hand crews were ordered to arrive Friday or Saturday. Seven engines and two tenders, a dozer and grader have arrived to assist dozers and graders on scene from Big Horn County and local ranchers. They should stir and mix that water to cool the fire.

Due to COVID-19 local firefighters have been challenged. More local tribal firefighters will be called in to assist ground operations.

The cause of the wildfire remains under investigation. 

More Stories Like This

President Biden's Memorial Day 2024 Proclamation: Prayer for Peace
Native News Weekly (May 26, 2024): D.C. Briefs
Former Sault Ste. Marie Chairperson Aaron Payment Making Comeback in Tribal Politics
California Assembly Passes Three Bills Aimed to Reduce Disproportionate Rates of Violence Against Native Americans
Eight Saint Regis Mohawk Citizens Arrested in Landback Protest

These stories must be heard.

This May, we are highlighting our coverage of Indian boarding schools and their generational impact on Native families and Native communities. Giving survivors of boarding schools and their descendants the opportunity to share their stories is an important step toward healing — not just because they are speaking, but because they are being heard. Their stories must be heard. Help our efforts to make sure Native stories and Native voices are heard in 2024. Please consider a recurring donation to help fund our ongoing coverage of Indian boarding schools. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous-centered journalism. Thank you.

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Native News Online is one of the most-read publications covering Indian Country and the news that matters to American Indians, Alaska Natives and other Indigenous people. Reach out to us at [email protected].