fbpx
 

CLINTON, Okla. —A reported incident involving a Cheyenne and Arapaho fifth-grader having his ponytail cut off by classmates has been called "inaccurate" by the tribes and the Clinton Public Schools.  

Yesterday, during a meeting with the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes officials and the Clinton Public Schools, it was estimated that the incident did not occur as it was reported on social media. The meeting included Cheyenne and Arapaho Gov. Reggie Wassana and Clinton Public Schools Superintendent Tyler Bridges.

After the meeting, the two released a joint statement that said, in part, “while some details remain disputed, Clinton Public Schools and the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes leadership agree that the initial report that the student was held down while his hair was cut is inaccurate and did not occur.” 

An investigation will continue as to what did occur and to determine what actions will be appropriate at that time, according to the statement. 

More Stories Like This

Native News Weekly (June 26, 2022): D.C. Briefs
Native Bidaské with Connie Johnson, Candidate in Oklahoma's Gubernatorial Primary
President Biden Signs New Gun Law Aimed to Keep Guns Away from Dangerous People
Supreme Court Overturns Roe v. Wade, Indian Country Responds
President Biden Nominates Patrice Kunesh for Commissioner of the Administration for Native Americans

Do you appreciate a Native perspective on the news? 

For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.

Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $20 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.