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Billy Ray Cyrus and Taboo of Black Eyed Peas are just two of the people talking tonight on the ‘Native Americans & Coronavirus Virtual Town Hall’ live stream. (courtesy photos)

A town hall discussion on the pandemic’s impact on Native communities and tribal government happens tonight at 8 p.m. EST. 

The town hall features country music star Billy Ray Cyrus, actress Piper Perabo and Taboo of the Black Eyed Peas, among others. This live conversation, dubbed The Native Americans & Coronavirus Virtual Town Hall, is co-hosted by Taboo, IllumiNative’s #WarriorUp campaign, NDN Collective and Indian Country Today. Indian Country Today’s Mark Trahant will moderate the event. It’s free to view and will be streamed on Taboo’s YouTube channel  as well as on each of the partners’ Facebook pages. According to Indianz.com, the stream aims to “unite Indian Country and allies against COVID-19.” Economic and healthcare issues will be explored by a lengthy panel Native leaders, legislators, influencers and advocates. Organizers say the goal is to let viewers know “how the pandemic is exacerbating disparities and inequalities affecting not only Native Americans but all communities of color,” a statement said.

The Native Americans & Coronavirus Virtual Town Hall Thursday, April 30th 8 P.M. Eastern Time Watch it HERE

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