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Red Fawn Fallis

MANDAN, N.D. — Standing Rock Water Protector Red Fawn Fallis, a Denver, Colorado resident, was sentenced to 57 months in prison on Wednesday afternoon. She was given credit for the 18 months she has already served. After her release, Fallis will be on a three-year supervised probation period. Her release will include a drug and alcohol treatment program.

Chief Judge Daniel Hovland said he is recommending Fallis be held in a prison in either Phoenix or Tucson, Arizona.

 

Fallis was arrested on October 27, 2016 at an incident at Standing Rock. She was one of more than 140 people arrested in a violent clash with law enforcement led by the Morton County Sheriff’s Department protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux Indian Reservation. Out of the more than 400 people that have been arrested protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline since the beginning of August of 2016, Fallis faced the most serious charges.

In January 2018, Fallis made a plea of guilty for civil disorder and possession of a firearm and ammunition by a felon, was to be sentenced on Monday, June 25, 2018. Due to the illness of the judge, her sentencing was delayed until today.

Under the agreement, prosecutors agreed to recommend a sentence of no more than seven years in prison, although the judge does have the authority to go as high as 10 years on these charges. There is no minimum sentence. If the judge decides not to accept the agreement the case will continue to trial on all three charges.

 

 

 

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Levi Rickert
Author: Levi RickertEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Levi Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) is the founder, publisher and editor of Native News Online. He can be reached at [email protected]