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Major General Michael Garshak, Councilman Lee JuanTyler, Governor Little and Chairman Ladd Edmo

BOISE, Idaho — The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes hosted a legislative reception on Jan. 29 in Boise to share the Tribe’s priorities for 2020 with Idaho lawmakers, state officials and Governor Brad Little.

Tribal officials provided an update on the Tribe’s 2020 Census efforts, tribal economic development, education, tax, and energy initiatives. 

Other information presented included the need for the development of a State Task Force on Missing and Murdered Indigenous People (MMIP) in Idaho, support for Idaho’s efforts to legalize hemp, and support for a proposed Tribal Cultural Center in Boise.

 More than 60 people attended the event, including Shoshone-Bannock Tribes citizen Dr. LaNada War Jack, who released a book late last year.

The following day, Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Chairman Edmo and Councilmember Lee Juan Tyler and staff attended an official meeting with Governor Little at the Statehouse. The Tribes and the Governor are working together to develop an executive order process for PL 280 retrocession.  The Governor’s Intergovernmental Director, Ms. Bobbi-Jo Muelman, was tasked to continue to work with the Tribes and other stakeholders to gain support for this executive order process. Other issues addressed during the meeting was in accordance with the Governor’s education priorities, whereas, the Tribes requested the Governor to focus and work cooperatively on Indian education issues.

The Tribes also requested the need to increase tribal representation on State boards and commissions, and the Governor encouraged all qualified tribal members to apply for any open positions by checking on the state of Idaho website.

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