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Editor's Note: This article was first published by the Navajo Times. Used with permission. All rights reserved.

SHONTO, Ariz. — The Shonto Preparatory School tenants and staff were ordered to shelter in place today after a tenant tested positive for COVID-19.

SPS administration on Saturday afternoon informed staff and tenants in a memo that a tenant who resides on the SPS campus had tested positive for the novel coronavirus at Tuba City Regional Health Care Corporation.

“Therefore, we will issue a shelter in place for all tenants who reside on the SPS compound beginning immediately,” said Ronald Thompson, superintendent for SPS.

Thompson wrote in the memo, that has not gone public, that an incident command and authorities have been notified.

“Staff, students, family takes refuge at home and begins isolating themselves from the public,” Thompson wrote in the memo regarding the rule to curb the COVID-19 outbreak. “Do not travel. Stay at home.

“Sanitize areas at home, sanitize hands with (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) requirements,” he said. “All persons must remain in safe areas at home and keep isolated/distance away from the public until (an) incident commander (or) emergency responder gives an all clear/safe notification.”

Thompson added that the SPS administration will begin sanitizing and disinfecting all areas of the school.

Calls to Thompson went unanswered. A request for comment to the SPS Governing Board also went unanswered.

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