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WASHINGTON — Rep. Sharice Davids (D-KS) was among eight members of the House of Representatives who met with President Joe Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris, and Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg in the Oval Office last Thursday. The bipartisan group of Members of Congress was there to discuss the need to create and pass an infrastructure package that would build back the U.S. economy with materials made in America, create good-paying jobs, and combat the effects of climate change.

Davids (Ho-Chunk), who is one of three American Indian women serving in the 117th Congress, serves as the House of Representatives Transportation and Infrastructure Committee vice chair.

“I appreciated the chance to speak with the President, Vice President, and Secretary of Transportation about the urgent need to pass a transformational infrastructure package – one that creates millions of good-paying jobs in the U.S., reduces carbon emissions, and builds our economy back better than before. Right now, we’re relying on the infrastructure our grandparents built. With President Biden in office, we have the opportunity to not just repair the infrastructure of the past, but to build the infrastructure of the future that our grandchildren will rely on,” Davids said.

President Biden shared his administration’s commitment to creating skilled-trades jobs across construction, manufacturing, and engineering sectors, fulfilling our obligation to working communities too often left behind, and positioning America to compete and win the 21st century.

Davids was named in January vice chair of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, which she has served on since she took office in 2019. Before serving in Congress, Davids worked at the U.S. Department of Transportation as a White House Fellow.

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