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The Seminole's flagship Hard Rock Casino in Hollywood, Florida is closed, as well as the tribe's other five casinos. (Courtesy photo)

HOLLYWOOD, Fla. — Citing the primary focus on the health and safety of guests, team members and the public in the midst of the COVID-19 (novel coronavirus), the Seminole Tribe of Florida and Seminole Gaming on Friday decided to voluntarily close all six Seminole and Hard Rock Casinos.

“This decision was not taken lightly as Seminole Gaming employs nearly 14,000 Seminole Gaming team members in the state. The goal has been to protect their livelihood without jeopardizing public safety. We have now reached a point where we do not feel comfortable taking that risk,” tribal officials said in a press release.

All Seminole casinos closed on Friday at 6 p.m. 

This affects the following casinos:

  •   Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tampa
  •   Seminole Casino Hotel Immokalee
  •   Seminole Casino Brighton
  •   Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Hollywood
  •   Seminole Casino Coconut Creek
  •   Seminole Classic Casino (Hollywood)

The Seminole Casinos joins dozens of other Indian gaming casinos that are shuttered due to the deadly virus. All of the casinos are closed voluntarily because Indian casinos are on trust land are governed by sovereign tribal nations.

“The safety and security of its guests and team members are of the highest priority to the Seminole Tribe, which is especially proud of its team’s response during this difficult time,” tribal officials further said in press release.

Editor’s Note: Native News Online is dedicated to providing the most accurate and up-to-date information about the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on Indian Country.

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About The Author
Levi Rickert
Author: Levi RickertEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Levi Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) is the founder, publisher and editor of Native News Online. Rickert was awarded Best Column 2021 Native Media Award for the print/online category by the Native American Journalists Association. He serves on the advisory board of the Multicultural Media Correspondents Association. He can be reached at [email protected]