fbpx
 

For some in Indian Country who watched President Joe Biden’s State of the Union address on Tuesday evening, the woman wearing a ribbon skirt sitting with First Lady Jill Biden in her viewing box caught their attention.

She is Melissa Isaac, a tribal citizen of the Saginaw Chippewa Tribe, located in Mt. Pleasant, Mich. Isaac serves her community through her role at the Michigan Department of Education.

Want more Native News? Get the free daily newsletter today.

Most recently, Isaac worked as the Director of Education for the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe. As an elementary school teacher at Saginaw Chippewa Academy (SCA), Isaac recognized the need to support the mental health of her students and their families.

She later successfully applied for a Project AWARE grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Using this grant, Isaac expanded mental health services for children at SCA and two public school districts, which included services for Native American children.

Issac met the First Lady Biden and U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy last October 24, 2021, when they hosted a listening session focused on youth mental health with members of the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe, educators, and families on the Isabella Indian Reservation in Mt. Pleasant.

On Tuesday evening, Issac traveled with the presidential motorcade from the White House to the U.S. Capitol.

 

More Stories Like This

Sen. Markwayne Mullin (Cherokee) Appointed to Senate Committee on Indian Affairs
American Indian Man Dies in Pennington County Jail
Interior Secretary Haaland to Travel to Australia, Highlight International Climate Partnerships
Deborah Parker and Dr. Samuel Torres on this week’s Native Bidaské
WATCH: Native Bidaské with Domestic Violence Prevention Specialist Kayla Woody Discuss the Dangers of Stalking

12 years of Native News

This month, we celebrate our 12th year of delivering Native News to readers throughout Indian Country and beyond. For the past dozen years, we’ve covered the most important news stories that are usually overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the rise of the American Indian Movement (AIM), to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous People (MMIP) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools.

Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps. If you’re in a position to do so, we ask you to consider making a recurring donation of $12 per month to help us remain a force for change in Indian Country and to tell the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Native News Online is one of the most-read publications covering Indian Country and the news that matters to American Indians, Alaska Natives and other Indigenous people. Reach out to us at [email protected]