fbpx
 

RED LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION — A Red Lake Nation Police Officer was shot and killed on Tuesday while on duty. The officer has been identified as Ryan Bialke, a non-tribal member. The incident occurred east of Redby, Minn. on the Red Lake Indian Reservation.

“It is with heavy hearts to announce that the Red Lake Nation lost a police officer this morning,” said the Red Lake Tribal Council in a statement. “Chairman Seki is directing all Tribal Programs and Businesses to lower flags to half-staff throughout this week. Sincere condolences to family and friends. Prayers and strength to the Red Lake Nation during this difficult time.”

Want more Native News? Get the free daily newsletter today.

The Red Lake Tribal Police Department did not provide a comment as of press time in regards to the incident, but is expected to make a statement soon. One person is in custody in connection with the incident.

In 2005, a shooting spree occurred on the Red Lake Indian Reservation killing ten people in various locations including the Red Lake High School.

“I know I’m going to miss the happiness you brought to me each time we would visit,” said Dana Lyons of Ryan Bialke in a Facebook post. “One of the best men I knew in my life, a good father and a person with a really big heart.” 

“Agents from our office are investigating a shooting that occurred early this morning on the Red Lake Indian Reservation, said the FBI Minneapolis Office. “RLPD officers were responding to a call at a residence when a subject fired a weapon killing an officer. Subject is in custody. Investigation is underway.”
 
The Red Lake Nation has full sovereignty over its reservation and is exempt from Public Law 280, subject only to the federal government. Felony crimes are investigated and prosecuted by the United States Department of Justice.
 

This is a developing story. 

More Stories Like This

Native News Weekly (January 16, 2022): D.C. Briefs
Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes to Host Annual "Would Jesus Eat Frybread?" Conference
Navajo Nation President Addresses Arizona State Legislature on Issues Facing Navajo People
Hundreds Gather for Clyde Bellecourt’s Funeral Services in Minneapolis
Triple Homicide on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation

The truth about Indian Boarding Schools

This month, we’re asking our readers to help us raise $10,000 to fund our year-long journalism initiative called “The Indian Boarding School Project: A Dark Chapter in History.”  Our mission is to shine a light on the dark era of forced assimilation of native American children by the U.S. government and churches.  You’ll be able to read stories each week and join us for Livestream events to understand what the Indian Boarding School era has meant to Native Americans — and what it still means today.

This news will be provided free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts.  Any contribution of any amount — big or small — gives us a better, stronger future and allows us to remain a force for change. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Author: Darren ThompsonEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Darren Thompson (Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe) is a freelance journalist and based in the Twin Cities of Minnesota, where he also contributes to Unicorn Riot, an alternative media publication. Thompson has reported on political unrest, tribal sovereignty, and Indigenous issues for the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, Indian Country Today, Native News Online, Powwows.com and Unicorn Riot. He has contributed to the New York Times, the Washington Post, and Voice of America on various Indigenous issues in international conversation. He has a bachelor’s degree in Criminology & Law Studies from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.