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SHIPROCK, N.M. — The Navajo Police Department is seeking the assistance of the public to locate Ella Mae Begay, who has been missing since Monday. She was reported missing on Tuesday, June 15, to the Navajo Police Department – Shiprock District.

Begay was last seen on Monday, June 14, near her home in Sweetwater, Ariz. driving a Silver 2005 Ford F-150 with ARIZONA license plate AFE7101. 

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According to the Navajo Police Department, 62-year-old Begay has a slender build, weighs approximately 110-120 lbs., is 5’-5’1” in height, and has brown eyes.

Over the last four days, local law enforcement and community volunteers have searched for Begay within a 9-mile radius around her home. Additionally, a Search Team Command Center has been set up at the Tółikan Chapter House.

On Thursday, a person of interest identified as Preston Tolth was arrested on Navajo Nation charges for an unrelated battery on a family member and was held at the Crownpoint Department of Corrections.

Tolth was also found to have outstanding warrants with the Farmington Police Department which resulted in extradition orders being approved by the Navajo Nation. Tolth is expected to be transported to the San Juan County Corrections facility on Friday evening.

He remains to be a person of interest in the disappearance of Ella Mae Preston. The Navajo Police Department Criminal Investigations, with assistance from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, continue to follow leads in regards to the overall investigation in the disappearance of Ella Mae Begay.

Anyone who has any information regarding Ella Mae Begay’s whereabouts or has seen her vehicle, please call the Navajo Police Department Shiprock District at 505-368-1350, 505-368-1351, or 9-1-1.

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