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WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. – On Thursday, the Navajo Department of Health, in coordination with the Navajo Epidemiology Center and the Navajo Area Indian Health Service, reported 19 new COVID-19 positive cases for the Navajo Nation and three recent deaths. The total number of deaths has reached 487 as of Thursday. Reports indicate that 6,996 individuals have recovered from COVID-19. 90,304 COVID-19 tests have been administered. The total number of COVID-19 positive cases is 9,519.

 Navajo Nation COVID-19 positive cases by Service Unit:

  • Chinle Service Unit: 2,293
  • Crownpoint Service Unit: 795
  • Ft. Defiance Service Unit: 745
  • Gallup Service Unit: 1,526
  • Kayenta Service Unit: 1,296
  • Shiprock Service Unit: 1,483
  • Tuba City Service Unit: 923
  • Winslow Service Unit: 454

* Four residences with COVID-19 positive cases are not specific enough to place them accurately in a Service Unit.

On Thursday, President Nez was joined by Miss Navajo Nation Shaandiin Parrish and the Navajo Police Department to hand out face masks, hand sanitizer, and preventative tips and information for COVID-19 during a public service announcement checkpoint along Highway 191 in Chinle, AZ. 

"Here on the Navajo Nation, we have gone 21 consecutive days with less than 50 new daily cases, but we have to remain diligent. We must adapt all preventative measures into our daily lives to lower the spread of the flu and COVID-19 on the Navajo Nation. As leaders, we have to help our people in any way possible during the pandemic, even at the frontlines to distribute face masks and hand sanitizers to our Navajo families and elders in need," said Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez.  

The Navajo Nation will have another 32-hour weekend lockdown beginning on Saturday, Aug. 22, at 9:00 p.m. (MDT) until Monday, Aug. 24, at 5:00 a.m. All businesses and tribal parks will be closed for the duration of the weekend lockdown. 

"As we begin to see fewer cases, we remind our citizens to continue to take care of their mental and physical health. Please stay connected with relatives and neighbors by phone or video chat and remind them that they have support. If you are feeling stress, anxious, or afraid, take the time to take a deep breath, stretch, pray, or call someone you know. Exercising, doing household chores, avoiding unhealthy foods, and drinks also help to keep us healthy. Take the time to rest and recover," said Vice President Lizer.

For more information, including helpful prevention tips, and resources to help stop the spread of COVID-19, visit the Navajo Department of Health's COVID-19 website: undefined://www.ndoh.navajo-nsn.gov/COVID-19&source=gmail&ust=1598057205834000&usg=AFQjCNFLSXKH0Ck0jz-emltr1PJD6XptHw">undefined. For COVID-19 related questions and information, call ‪‪(928) 871-7014‪.

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