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WINDOW ROCK, Ariz.— In commemoration of Memorial Day, the Navajo men and women who gave their lives while serving in the U.S. Armed Forces were remembered today by Navajo Nation’s leadership at Veterans Memorial Park in Window Rock, Ariz.

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez, Vice President Myron Lizer, First Lady Phefelia Nez, and Second Lady Dottie Lizer were joined by 24th Navajo Nation Council Delegate Raymond Smith, Jr., Navajo Nation Veterans Administration Executive Director James Zwierlein, and Miss Navajo Nation Shaandiin Parrish to pay tribute to fallen warriors as they laid wreaths at the memorial wall, which lists the names of Navajo men and women who gave the ultimate sacrifice for the United States.

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“Our country has set aside this day to pay tribute to our fallen warriors who gave their last measure of service and devotion for this Nation that we love. Today, we remember and honor our Navajo warriors who protected this country with honor, courage, and selflessness. We pray for and thank the family and comrades of our fallen heroes – spouses, children, brothers, sisters, and relatives for their sacrifice and service,” President Nez said.

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez showing his respects on Memorial Day.

He also paid special tribute to Gold Star families, military families, and veterans who continue to carry on the legacy of their loved ones. 

“Let us pray together today for the families to help them heal so they may be strong for themselves and their families. We are so grateful for the families of our fallen. Let’s also remember those who are currently serving overseas and across this country,” added President Nez. 

Vice President Lizer highlighted the importance of remembering and commemorating the sacrifices of past warriors who defended our freedom. 

“We thank the Creator for blessing our Nation with so many great warriors. We also pray for our Navajo citizens who have lost their lives during the COVID-19 pandemic. We are all on this road of mourning and healing, but we will prevail with God’s grace,” Vice President Lizer stated. 

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