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WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. On Tuesday, the Navajo Department of Health identified the following 75 communities with uncontrolled spread of Covid-19 from Jan. 1, 2021 to Jan. 14, 2021:

Aneth

Baca/Prewitt

Bird Springs

Black Mesa

Bodaway/Gap

Bread Springs*

Cameron

Casamero Lake

Chichiltah

Chinle

Churchrock

Coppermine

Cornfields

Cove*

Coyote Canyon

Crownpoint

Dennehotso

Gadiiahi*

Ganado

Hard Rock*

Hogback

Houck

Indian Wells

Inscription House

Iyanbito

Jeddito

Kaibeto

Kayenta

Lechee

Leupp

Lukachukai

Lupton

Many Farms

Mariano Lake

Mexican Springs*

Nageezi

Nahatadziil

Nahodishgish

Naschitti

Nazlini

Nenahnezad

Oak Springs

Oljato

Pinedale

Pinon

Ramah

Red Lake

Red Mesa

Red Valley

Rock Point

Rock Springs

Rough Rock

Round Rock

San Juan

Sanostee

Sheepsprings

Shiprock

Shonto

Smith Lake

St. Michaels

Standing Rock

Tachee/Blue Gap

Teec Nos Pos

Teesto*

Thoreau

Tohatchi

Tonalea

Torreon

Tsaile/Wheatfields

Tsayatoh

Tuba City

Twin Lakes

Two Grey Hills

Upper Fruitland

Whippoorwill

* Chapters recently added to the list

“With more and more reports of the Covid-19 variant being reported in various regions, we must continue to take all precautions. The variant is reported to be much more contagious, making it easier for the virus to infect from person to person. I am hopeful that we are beginning to see a downward trend, but that depends on the actions of all of us. We all have a part to play in bringing down the numbers of new Covid-19 cases. Stay strong and keep fighting. We are in this together,” Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez said.

Public Health Emergency Order No. 2021-001 remains in effect through Jan. 25, 2021 with the following provisions:

  • Extends the Stay-At-Home Lockdown which requires all residents to remain at home 24-hours, seven days a week, with the exceptions of essential workers that must report to work, emergency situations, to obtain essential food, medication, and supplies, tend to livestock, outdoor exercising within the immediate vicinity of your home, wood gathering and hauling with a permit.
  • Re-implements full 57-hour weekend lockdowns, including Friday, Jan. 22 beginning at 8:00 p.m. until Monday, Jan. 25 at 5:00 a.m. MST. 
  • Essential businesses including gas stations, grocery stores, laundromats, restaurants and food establishments that provide drive-thru and curbside services, and hay vendors can operate from 7:00 a.m. (MST) to 7:00 p.m., Monday through Friday only.
  • Refrain from gathering with individuals from outside your immediate household and requiring all residents to wear a mask in public, avoid public gatherings, maintain social (physical) distancing, remain in your vehicle for curb-side and drive-through services.

On Tuesday, the Navajo Department of Health, in coordination with the Navajo Epidemiology Center and the Navajo Area Indian Health Service, reported 45 new Covid-19 positive cases for the Navajo Nation and no recent deaths. The total number of deaths remains 922 as previously reported on Monday. Reports indicate that 13,566 individuals have recovered from Covid-19, and 224,108 Covid-19 tests have been administered. The total number of positive Covid-19 cases is now 26,517.

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