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Tomorrow at approximately 2:20 pm - EDT, your cell phone will ring or vibrate with a test of the national system that is set up to alert Americans of emergencies. 

Millions of mobile phone across the country via Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA), radio and television via the Emergency Alert System (EAS), and other communication pathways will be alerted.

The national Integrated Public Alert and Warning Systems (IPAWS) tes, in coordination with the  Federal Communications Commission (FCC), will conduct the nationwide test.

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The national test will consist of two portions, testing WEA and EAS capabilities. 

The WEA portion of the test will be directed to all consumer cell phones. This will be the third nationwide test, but the second test to all cellular devices. The test message will display in either English or in Spanish, depending on the language settings of the wireless handset.

The EAS portion of the test will be sent to radios and televisions. This will be the seventh nationwide EAS test.

FEMA and the FCC are coordinating with EAS participants, wireless providers, emergency managers and other stakeholders in preparation for this national test to minimize confusion and to maximize the public safety value of the test.

The purpose of the Oct. 4 test is to ensure that the systems continue to be effective means of warning the public about emergencies, particularly those on the national level. In case the Oct. 4 test is postponed due to widespread severe weather or other significant events, the back-up testing date is Oct. 11. 

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