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Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer paying respects of the Navajo who sacrificed theirs lives for their country.

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. – The Navajo Department of Health in coordination with the Navajo Epidemiology Center and the Navajo Area Indian Health Service reported 105 new cases of COVID-19 for the Navajo Nation. The total number of deaths has reached 157 as of Monday. Preliminary reports from eight health care facilities indicate that approximately 1,491 individuals have recovered from COVID-19, with more reports still pending. The total number of positive COVID-19 cases for the Navajo Nation has reached 4,794.

Navajo Nation cases by Service Unit:

  • Chinle Service Unit: 1,169
  • Crownpoint Service Unit: 503
  • Ft. Defiance Service Unit: 236
  • Gallup Service Unit: 834
  • Kayenta Service Unit: 746
  • Shiprock Service Unit: 774
  • Tuba City Service Unit: 418
  • Winslow Service Unit: 83

*31 residences are not specific enough to place them accurately in a Service Unit

“The curve is flattening on the Navajo Nation, even as we test aggressively. 14.6-percent of our citizens have been tested so far. The Navajo Nation continues to test at a higher rate per capita than any state in the country. Testing, contact tracing, and the public health orders that were implemented months ago requiring protective masks in public and weekend lockdowns are working and flattening the curve. When you look at the projections that were provided in March and compare them to numbers that we have, we are actually doing much better than the projections,” said Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez.

On Monday, the Navajo Nation Office of the President and Vice President, in coordination with the Navajo Veterans Administration, hosted a Memorial Day wreath laying ceremony to honor military men and women who lost their lives defending our country and those missing in action, and a food distribution for Navajo veterans and others. A total of 586 families were served.

“Continue to stay home, practice social distancing, and pray and the numbers will decrease gradually. This is not the time to let up. We can’t give up and we have to keep fighting hard to overcome the virus. The numbers are high, but it’s great to see that overall the rate of new cases is flattening, so let’s keep up the good practices and continue to pray for everyone,” said Vice President Myron Lizer.

The Office of the President and Vice President will host an online town hall on Tuesday, May 26 at 10:00 a.m. (MDT) on the Nez-Lizer Facebook page. President Nez and Vice President Lizer will be joined the Navajo Department of Health and Navajo Area IHS to provide important updates.

For more information including reports, helpful prevention tips, and more resources, please visit the Navajo Department of Health’s COVID-19 website at http://www.ndoh.navajo-nsn.gov/COVID-19. To contact the main Navajo Health Command Operations Center, please call (928) 871-7014.

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