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WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. – On Monday, the Navajo Department of Health, in coordination with the Navajo Epidemiology Center and the Navajo Area Indian Health Service, reported 12 new positive COVID-19 cases for the Navajo Nation and no recent deaths. The total number of deaths has reached 480 as of Monday. 6,978 individuals have recovered from COVID-19 and 89,003 COVID-19 tests have been administered. The total number of COVID-19 positive cases is 9,469 and negative tests total 74,699.

Navajo Nation COVID-19 positive cases by Service Unit:

  • Chinle Service Unit: 2,284
  • Crownpoint Service Unit: 794
  • Ft. Defiance Service Unit: 738
  • Gallup Service Unit: 1,520
  • Kayenta Service Unit: 1,294
  • Shiprock Service Unit: 1,478
  • Tuba City Service Unit: 908
  • Winslow Service Unit: 449

* 10 residences with COVID-19 positive cases are not specific enough to place them accurately in a Service Unit.

On Monday, the Office of the President and Vice President, Navajo Nation Division of Human Resources, and the Navajo Health Command Operations Center implemented Phase One of the "Navajo Nation Reopening Plan," which serves as a guide to safely and gradually reopen businesses on the Navajo Nation during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The plan includes safety-guidelines for Navajo Nation residents to follow through the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic, directs places of business to implement COVID-19 policies and procedures meeting specific standards, and provides a color-coded system for progressively reopening business on the Navajo Nation based on data-driven analysis and input from health experts.

"The reopening plan will not be rushed. The administration spent many weeks working together with health care experts to develop the phased-in reopening plan. The plan prioritizes elders and individuals that are at higher risk for severe illness. It ensures the Nation's healthcare system is responsive to increases in admissions and responds to future crises and any resurgences while allowing a phased path to recovery. Businesses on the Nation will reopen progressively, in conjunction with a color-coded status schedule, which identifies different reopening activity levels. As we slowly reopen, we urge Navajo residents to continue practicing preventative measures to avoid exposure. We still need to be alert and prepared," Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez said. 

The Navajo Nation Executive Branch has also created the "Navajo Nation COVID-19 Worksite Safety Guidelines," specifically for its Divisions and Departments to follow as administrative leave of non-essential Executive Branch employees came to an end on Aug. 16. Divisions and Departments have been directed to utilize the Executive Branch Guidelines' recommendations—e.g., provide personnel with sufficient and appropriate PPE and disinfectant products, create alternative work schedules, etc.—in crafting their plans to resume and revitalize services. 

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