fbpx
facebook app symbol  twitter  linkedin  instagram 1
 

SANTA ANA PUEBLO, New Mexico — Interior Secretary Deb Haaland married her longtime partner Skip Sayre on Saturday at the Santa Ana Pueblo, located north of Albuquerque, N.M.

 Friends and relatives of the couple began posting photos of the wedding reception on social media on Sunday.

Want more Native News? Get the free daily newsletter today.

Even the groom got into the act. He wrote on his Facebook page:

“Last night Debra and I were married at Hyatt Regency Tamaya in Santa Ana Pueblo. Shortly after the ceremony, the clouds opened up to a rainstorm and a big, bright rainbow appeared.”

U.S. Dept. of the Interior Press Secretary Tyler Cherry confirmed the marriage in a statement emailed to Native News Online Sunday evening:

“Secretary Deb Haaland celebrated her union with longtime partner Skip Sayre at a ceremony in her home state of New Mexico on Saturday night. Consistent with CDC guidance and New Mexico’s public health orders, guests were required to be vaccinated and wear masks. The Secretary’s dress was designed and sewn by her sister and the ceremony included traditional elements to honor her ancestry.”

According to social media posts, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Rep. Sharice Davids (D-KS) attended the wedding reception. 

When she was sworn in on March 18, 2021, Haaland became the first American Indian to serve as a presidential cabinet secretary. She is a tribal citizen of the Laguna Pueblo.

More Stories Like This

Senate Committee on Indian Affairs to Host Hearing on Public Safety in Indian Country
Native Bidaské with Kevin Sharp on Leonard Peltier’s Upcoming Parole Hearing
Senate Subcommittee to Hear Testimony on President Biden’s FY Budget for Indian Programs on Thursday
Native News Weekly (May 19, 2024): D.C. Briefs
Native Artist and Former Cultural Advisor to the Chicago Blackhawks Sues Team for Sexual Harassment, Fraud

These stories must be heard.

This May, we are highlighting our coverage of Indian boarding schools and their generational impact on Native families and Native communities. Giving survivors of boarding schools and their descendants the opportunity to share their stories is an important step toward healing — not just because they are speaking, but because they are being heard. Their stories must be heard. Help our efforts to make sure Native stories and Native voices are heard in 2024. Please consider a recurring donation to help fund our ongoing coverage of Indian boarding schools. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous-centered journalism. Thank you.

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Native News Online is one of the most-read publications covering Indian Country and the news that matters to American Indians, Alaska Natives and other Indigenous people. Reach out to us at [email protected].