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WASHINGTON — The dedication ceremony of the National Native American Veterans Memorial that was scheduled for Veterans Day on Nov. 11 has been postponed because of the COVID-19 pandemic. A veterans’ procession also scheduled for that date has been postponed as well.

In its place, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian will host a virtual event on Nov. 11 to mark the completion of the National Native American Veterans Memorial.

The memorial was commissioned by Congress and will have a home on the grounds of the National Museum of the American Indian’s Washington, D.C. location. It will be the first national landmark in Washington to focus on the contributions of American Indians, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians who served in the U.S. military.

The memorial design is by Harvey Pratt (Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma), a multimedia artist, retired forensic artist and Marine Corps Vietnam veteran.   

November’s virtual event will also acknowledge the service and sacrifice of Native veterans and their families. More information about the event is forthcoming.   

The museum planned to host a dedication ceremony and veterans’ procession to mark the memorial’s completion. The museum will reschedule both events when it is safe to do so at a future date.    

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