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WASHINGTON — It is time to “spring forward” with daylight saving time in most states and reservatons across the United States.

With the return of Daylight Saving Time, you will lose an hour of sleep because the time changes from 2:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. overnight on Sunday, March 14, 2021. Your early mornings will be dimmer and your evenings brighter.

Most states comply with daylight saving time change. The state of Arizona does not comply with the time change, except for the Navajo Indian Reservation where a large portion of it is situated in Arizona. The other state that does not comply with daylight saving time is Hawaii.

With the advent of technology, such as computers, smart phones, and tablets, many clocks will self-adjust to daylight saving time at 2:00 a.m. However, other clocks and watches will still need to be changed manually.

The Fireman’s Association of the State of New York (FASNY) is reminding residents to test smoke detector devices during the start and end of Daylight Saving Time every year.

The time will fall back to standard time at 2:00 a.m., November 7, 2021 when you can regain the hour of sleep you lose overnight.

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