fbpx
facebook app symbol  twitter  linkedin  instagram 1
 
Paulette Jordan at RES in 2018. Native News Online  photo by Levi Rickert

BOISE, Idaho — Paulette Jordan, 40, has announced her candidacy for the United States Senate seat in Idaho. Jordan was the Democratic gubernatorial candidate for governor of Idaho in 2018 and lost to Republican Gov.

Brad Little. She is a Democrat, who resigned her state representative seat to run for governor. She is a tribal citizen of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians, where she has previously served on the tribal council.

Jordan made this following statement on her Facebook page on Friday afternoon:

"I’m excited to announce my candidacy for U.S. Senate to represent the people of Idaho.

Over the past several years, I have traveled around the Gem State and have listened as Idahoans from all walks of life have expressed frustration with the corruption and partisan gridlock in Congress.

Our American heritage and values are important to us in Idaho. We are patriots through and through. We covet our individual rights, like our right to bear arms, our right to property, our right to vote.

 

This election is the most important election in our country’s history because there is so much at stake."

Jordan joins a field of three other Democrats who are running for the Democratic nomination to run against 76-year-old current U.S. Senator Jim Risch.

Jordan currently serves as secretary on the Board of Directors of the National Indian Gaming Association.

This is a developing story. Native News Online will provide more information about Jordan’s candidacy in the near future.

More Stories Like This

Native News Weekly (June 16, 2024): D.C. Briefs
25th Navajo Nation Council Honors the Service of All Women Veterans
Photographs of the Homecoming of the Three Fires Powwow
Zuni Youth Enrichment Project Prepares to Kick Off Second Annual T-Ball League
Justice Dept. Scathing Report: Native Americans Face Discrimination by Phoenix Police

Join us in celebrating 100 years of Native citizenship. On June 2, 1924, President Calvin Coolidge signed the Indian Citizenship Act, granting Native Americans US citizenship, a pivotal moment in their quest for equality. This year marks its centennial, inspiring our special project, "Heritage Unbound: Native American Citizenship at 100," celebrating their journey with stories of resilience, struggle, and triumph. Your donations fuel initiatives like these, ensuring our coverage and projects honoring Native American heritage thrive. Your donations fuel initiatives like these, ensuring our coverage and projects honoring Native American heritage thrive.

About The Author
Levi Rickert
Author: Levi RickertEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Levi "Calm Before the Storm" Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) is the founder, publisher and editor of Native News Online. Rickert was awarded Best Column 2021 Native Media Award for the print/online category by the Native American Journalists Association. He serves on the advisory board of the Multicultural Media Correspondents Association. He can be reached at [email protected].