fbpx
 
Paulette Jordan at RES in 2018. Native News Online  photo by Levi Rickert

BOISE, Idaho — Paulette Jordan, 40, has announced her candidacy for the United States Senate seat in Idaho. Jordan was the Democratic gubernatorial candidate for governor of Idaho in 2018 and lost to Republican Gov.

Brad Little. She is a Democrat, who resigned her state representative seat to run for governor. She is a tribal citizen of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians, where she has previously served on the tribal council.

Jordan made this following statement on her Facebook page on Friday afternoon:

"I’m excited to announce my candidacy for U.S. Senate to represent the people of Idaho.

Over the past several years, I have traveled around the Gem State and have listened as Idahoans from all walks of life have expressed frustration with the corruption and partisan gridlock in Congress.

Our American heritage and values are important to us in Idaho. We are patriots through and through. We covet our individual rights, like our right to bear arms, our right to property, our right to vote.

 

This election is the most important election in our country’s history because there is so much at stake."

Jordan joins a field of three other Democrats who are running for the Democratic nomination to run against 76-year-old current U.S. Senator Jim Risch.

Jordan currently serves as secretary on the Board of Directors of the National Indian Gaming Association.

This is a developing story. Native News Online will provide more information about Jordan’s candidacy in the near future.

More Stories Like This

Native News Weekly (September 25, 2022): D.C. Briefs
Rep. Mary Sattler Peltola Hits the Ground Running: Her First Bill Introduced Clears Committee Two Days Later
EXCLUSIVE: Deb Haaland Q&A on Road to Healing Tour Progress
September 20 is National Voter Registration Day: Native Organizations Team Up to Increase Native Youth Voter Engagement
Tribal Business News Round-Up: Sept. 19

Do you appreciate a Native perspective on the news? 

For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.

Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $20 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Levi Rickert
Author: Levi RickertEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Levi Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) is the founder, publisher and editor of Native News Online. Rickert was awarded Best Column 2021 Native Media Award for the print/online category by the Native American Journalists Association. He serves on the advisory board of the Multicultural Media Correspondents Association. He can be reached at [email protected]