fbpx
 

In an effort to improve tribal input and consultation with the federal government, the American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association (AIANTA) and the National Park Service (NPS) and) have entered into a cooperative agreement to help facilitate regular, robust and meaningful dialogue between Tribes and the NPS.

The cooperative agreement was entered into on Wednesday at the 23rd Annual American Indian Tourism Conference that is in session at the We-Ko-Pa Casino Resort in Fort McDowell, Ariz.

Want more Native News? Get the free daily newsletter today.

“We are thrilled to formalize our long-standing relationship with the National Park Service under this agreement,” Sherry L. Rupert, CEO of AIANTA, said. “Our previous partnerships with individual park sites, such as the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail and the Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail have successfully driven awareness of the tribes located along those sites. We look forward to further growing awareness of tribal tourism opportunities at additional park sites across the country.”

According to a recent survey conducted by AIANTA, tribal nations and communities engaged in tourism at National Park sites gateway communities have expressed an interest in working with the NPS. Results of AIANTA’s American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Gateway Communities Survey found 90 percent of respondents want to partner or work with the National Park Service and public lands agencies. Eighty percent of those responding indicated they provide support for visitors to public land attractions with food (71 percent) and lodging (61 percent) topping the list of services provided.

“We look forward to expanding our relationship with AIANTA, which has already been instrumental in developing networks between the National Park Service and Native American communities,” said National Park Service Deputy Director Shawn Benge. “AIANTA’s national and international tourism programs have benefitted local communities and the organization’s past work with the NPS has demonstrated AIANTA’s understanding of the historic connections between tribes and the NPS.”

More than 70 Tribes have been contacted to lend their voice to Tribal Stories Along the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail. The project includes educational webinars for Tribes, a print and online guidebook of Tribal attractions on or near the trail, and a map that translates key locations along the trail into the original native languages. A similar project to bring Tribal awareness to the forefront of the visitor experience is also underway for the Lewis & Clark National Historical Trail.

During Native American Heritage Month in November, and throughout the year, the National Park Service and its partners commemorate the traditions and contributions of America’s Indigenous peoples. AIANTA frequently provides connections between the NPS and Tribal leaders. The new five-year agreement will expand opportunities for communication through AIANTA sponsored virtual and in-person forums between the NPS and Native nations located in national park gateway communities.

More Stories Like This

Fox News Can’t Handle the Truth about What Happened on the First Thanksgiving
Representing in Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade: Wampanoag Elders Provide a Blessing and Land Acknowledgement
Thanksgiving Message from the 24th Navajo Nation Council
Legislation May Expand Reservation
Racist Teddy Roosevelt Statue to Relocate to North Dakota; Tribal Leaders Say They Were Not Consulted

Native Perspective.  Native Voices.  Native News. 

We launched Native News Online because the mainstream media often overlooks news that is important is Native people. We believe that everyone in Indian Country deserves equal access to news and commentary pertaining to them, their relatives and their communities. That's why the story you’ve just finished was free — and we want to keep it that way, for all readers.  We hope you'll consider making a donation to support our efforts so that we can continue publishing more stories that make a difference to Native people, whether they live on or off the reservation. Your donation will help us keep producing quality journalism and elevating Indigenous voices. Any contribution of any amount — big or small — gives us a better, stronger future and allows us to remain a force for change. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you.

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.