fbpx
 

The all-virtual 2021 Vine Deloria Jr Theological Symposium at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (LSTC), presenters will examine the intersection of Indian boarding schools and theological/Christian education as well as the work being done across the United States to bring truth and healing.  The two-day symposium will be held Tuesday, Nov. 16 and Wednesday, Nov. 17.

Register here for the online symposium on Nov. 16 and 17. Events will also be livestreamed on LSTC's Facebook page. An event flier is also available.

Want more Native News? Get the free daily newsletter today.

The first night of the symposium features a keynote address by the Rev. Dr. R. Guy Erwin (Osage), president of United Lutheran Seminary, Philadelphia, Pa. The lecture takes place live Nov. 16, 7-8:30 p.m. Central time on Zoom.

In this lecture, Erwin will take a closer look at the intersection of Indian boarding schools and theological/Christian education.

New to this year’s symposium are Learning Lunches. At noon Nov. 16, Christine Diindiisi McCleave (Anishinaabe), CEO, National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition, leads ‘An Introduction to Indian Boarding Schools in the United States.’

On Nov. 17, the Learning Lunch with Kim Smith (Dine), INihi Ké Baa' (For Our Relatives) and Indigenous Goddess Gang, is a discussion on ‘Creation and Climate Justice.’ The Vine Deloria Jr. Theological Symposium is adding a climate justice session each year.

Rev. Manuel Retamoza (Cherokee), pastor of St. Andrew's Lutheran Church, San Diego, Calif., will be the guest preacher for worship Nov. 17 at 11:15 a.m. 

The 2021 Vine Deloria Jr. Theological Symposium concludes Nov. 17 with a 7 p.m. panel presentation with Patsy Whitefoot (Yakama), elder, educator and consultant, and boarding school survivor; and Deborah Parker (Tulalip Tribes), director of policy and advocacy, National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition.  

Other+Wise is a co-sponsor of the symposium.

More Stories Like This

Interior Secretary Deb Haaland Visits the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site
History Was Made as Nicole Aunapu Mann Became the First Native American Woman Launched into Space
Tribal Business News Round Up: Oct. 4
Hurricane Ian Slams Southwest Florida, But Mostly Spares Reservations
Department of the Interior Announces South Dakota Third Stop on Road to Healing Tour

Do you appreciate a Native perspective on the news? 

For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.

Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $20 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Native News Online is one of the most-read publications covering Indian Country and the news that matters to American Indians, Alaska Natives and other Indigenous people. Reach out to us at [email protected]