fbpx
 

The U.S. Attorney’s Office, based in Phoenix, Ariz. announced on Wednesday, November 16 the indictment of 17 individuals on a variety of federal crimes committed on the San Carlos Indian Reservation that include arson, aggravated assault, firearms violations, domestic violence assaults, assault against an officer, child abuse, sexual assault, kidnapping, manslaughter, and murder.

The indictment comes as the result of an intensive violent crime initiative on the reservation that was led by the Federal Bureau Investigation (FBI). The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and the San Carlos Apache Tribal Police Dept. assisted in the initiative.

Want more Native News? Get the free daily newsletter today.

An indictment is simply a method by which a person is charged with criminal activity and raises no inference of guilt. An individual is presumed innocent until competent evidence is presented to a jury that establishes guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

If convicted, the individuals arrested face from five years to life in prison, depending on the crime.

Assistant U.S. Attorneys Thomas C. Simon and Dimitra H. Sampson, District of Arizona, Phoenix, are handling the prosecution.

According to the Census Bureau, 10,251 individuals lived on the San Carlos Indian Reservation in 2020. The reservation is 135 miles of Pheonix, Ariz.

 

 

More Stories Like This

Manitoba Man Charged with Killing 3 More Indigenous Women, House of Commons Rejects State of Emergency Request
SEEN & HEARD at the White House Tribal Nations Summit
Native News Weekly (December 4, 2022): D.C. Briefs
White House Tribal Summit, Day Two: Biden Administration Commits to Tribal Health and Justice Programs
San Manuel Band of Mission Indians Surprises Native Nonprofits with $1M in Donations on #GivingTuesday

Do you appreciate a Native perspective on the news? 

For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.

Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $25 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Native News Online is one of the most-read publications covering Indian Country and the news that matters to American Indians, Alaska Natives and other Indigenous people. Reach out to us at [email protected]