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This weekend and next week in Indian Country, holiday markets kick off, film screenings abound and the American Association of Indian Affairs celebrates 100 years with the first annual Tribal Museum Day. Here is Native News Online’s weekly round-up of arts, culture and entertainment offerings around Indian Country.


Native American Holiday Market 
Saturday, Dec 3, 10 a.m.- 3 p.m.
Greenbay, WI

Hosted by the Oneida Nation Arts Program, the market features Native American artists and craftsmen. Shop for unique fine art, jewelry, beadwork, baskets, or Native fashion and accessories.

Sky Hopinka: I’ll Remember You as You Were, Not as What You’ll Become
Thursday, Dec. 1 —Sunday, Dec 04, 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. 
Sheboygan, WI

An elegy to the late Native American poet Diane Burns, Sky Hopinka’s I’ll Remember You as You Were, Not as What You’ll Become is a meditation on mortality, reincarnation, and the forms the transcendent spirit takes while descending upon landscapes of life and death. The film continues Hopinka’s exploration of how his indigenous homeland, language, and identity interconnect. In his carefully composed and thickly layered film, Hopinka weaves together original and found images and sounds to form a visual and aural montage that is sublime and otherworldly yet grounded in reality. Archival footage of Burns—a poet known for challenging Native American stereotypes—is punctuated with powwow dancers filmed by Hopinka and ethnographic texts on Ho-Chunk concepts of rebirth and the afterlife written by American anthropologist Paul Radin. The rhythmic sound of Sacred Harp singing and ambient electronic music from the film’s soundtrack.

Curator’s Tour: Breathing Life into History
Thursday, Dec. 1, 12:15 p.m.
Fort Wayne, TX and Online

Take a tour of the Fort Wayne Museum of Art’s exhibition Breathing Life into History: Contemporary Native American Art from the Collection. 

 The featured artists’ abilities to either weave their heritage into contemporary contexts through medium and imagery, or continue using traditional methods in a modern world, speaks to their self-expression. Influences seen throughout the works include textiles, nature, rituals and storytelling, and identity and politics. Indigenous artists have, and continue to, create with their cultural knowledge, reinterpret tradition, and engage with current topics.

Artists in this exhibition include mixed-media artist Jeffrey Gibson, master printmaker Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, glass sculptor Tony Jojola, and ceramicist Maria Martinez.

This tour is free with museum admission, but an RSVP is required. Please use this form to reserve your tickets. Payment will be taken at the door for non-members. Limit of 16 in-person visitors. Unlimited digital attendance through our Facebook Live or YouTube Live tours at the same time.

Imagining the Indian at the Field Museum 
Monday, Dec. 5, 5:30 — 8 p.m. 
Chicago, Il 

Imagining the Indian: The Fight Against Native American Mascoting is a documentary that examines the movement that is ending the use of Native American names, logos, and mascots in the world of sports and beyond. The film details the current uprising against the misappropriation of Native culture in a national reckoning about racial injustice that has succeeded in the removal of Confederate imagery, toppling statues of Christopher Columbus and forcing corporate sponsors of Washington’s NFL team to demand it change its most-offensive name. 

The film will be screened at the Field Museum’s James Simpson Theatre, followed by a panel discussion with the filmmakers. 

Tribal Museums Day
Saturday, Dec. 3
In-person and online 

In celebration of the Association on American Indian Affairs’ 100th anniversary, the Association is hosting the first annual Tribal Museums Day with free admission to participating Tribal Museums across the nation. Participating museums include the Bay Mills Indian Community’s Gnoozhekaaning History Museum in Brimley, Michigan; the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska’s Angel De Cora Museum in Winnebago, Nebraska; and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indian’s Museum of the Cherokee Indian. For a complete list of participating museums and to find one near you, see the official listing at indian-affairs.org.

Dawnland Screening 
Tuesday, Dec 06, 7–9 p.m.
Online

Dawnland is the behind-the-scenes story of the first official Truth and Reconciliation Commission in the United States to uncover the shocking removal of Native American children from their homes to “save them from being Indian” by child welfare authorities. Dawnland aired on Independent Lens on PBS in November 2018 and 202, reaching more than two million viewers and winning a national Emmy® Award for Outstanding Research in 2018. Mishy Lesser, Ed.D, Learning Director for Upstander Project and Emmy® award-winning researcher, will lead a Q&A and discussion after the viewing. 

Native Art Market
Saturday, Dec. 03, 10 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.
Washington D.C.

The National Museum of the American Indian annual Native Art Market at the museum in Washington, DC, features works by award-winning and innovative Indigenous artists from the Western Hemisphere. The weekend event offers visitors a unique opportunity to purchase traditional and contemporary handcrafted artworks—including beadwork, jewelry, paintings, photography, pottery, and sculpture. In addition, the Native Art Market invites art lovers of art and craftsmanship to meet Native artists and learn about traditional Native arts and contemporary Native creativity.

 Native Art Market
Saturday, Dec. 03, 10 a.m.- 5 p.m.
New York City

The National Museum of the American Indian annual Native Art Market at the museum in New York, NY, features works by award-winning and innovative Indigenous artists from the Western Hemisphere. The weekend event offers visitors a unique opportunity to purchase traditional and contemporary handcrafted artworks—including beadwork, jewelry, paintings, photography, pottery, and sculpture. In its 15th year, the Native Art Market invites art lovers of art and craftsmanship to meet Native artists and learn about traditional Native arts and contemporary Native creativity.

 Artist Discussion: Ancestors Know Who We Are
Saturday, Dec. 03, 2–3 p.m.
Washington D.C. and Online 

Join the artists featured in the National Museum of the American Indian’s online exhibition Ancestors Know Who We Are for a discussion about Black-Native identity and its expression through art. Participating artists are Joelle Joyner (African American and Kauwets’a:ka [Meherrin] descent); Moira Pernambuco (African and Amerindian [Wapishana]); Paige Pettibon (Black, Salish, and white descent); Monica Rickert-Bolter (Prairie Band Potawatomi, Black, and German); and Storme Webber (Alaskan Sugpiaq [Alutiiq] and Black descent). Amber Starks, aka Melanin Mvskoke (Black/Muscogee Creek), moderates, with introductions by exhibition curator Anya Montiel (Mexican and Tohono O’odham descent).

Waniyetu Art Market
Dec. 8-10 
Shakopee, MN

The annual Waniyetu Art Market returns to Hoċokata Ti on December 8-10. The three-day event is open to the public and features artisans and vendors offering Native American handcrafted items that are perfect for the holiday gift-giving season. Featured items include beadwork, paintings, body care products, clothing, jewelry, pottery, home decor, and woodwork designs.

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Fireside Chat with Sarah Rowe
Saturday, Dec. 03, 1–2 p.m.
Omaha, NB

Join the Kaneko Galleries in Omaha, NB, for a discussion with Lakota artist Sarah Lowe about her solo exhibition, Post. Rowe is a multimedia artist based in Omaha, NE. Her work opens cross-cultural dialogues by utilizing methods of painting, casting, fiber arts, performance, and Native American ceremony in unconventional ways. Rowe’s work is participatory, a call to action, and re-imagines traditional Native American symbology to fit the narrative of today’s global landscape. Using skewed imagery in historic texts and images from Lakota winter counts, Rowe projects her vision of contemporary Indigenous experience into the mix with an offbeat enchantment. Rowe’s imagined landscapes are bold and vibrant, containing a shape-shifting bestiary of tales both familiar and strange. Rowe holds a B.A. in Studio Art from Webster University, studying in St. Louis, MO, and Vienna, Austria. She is of Lakota and Ponca descent.

Ryan LittleEagle Live at Taste
Friday, Dec. 2, 6–9 p.m.
Dahlonega, GA

Ryan LittleEagle is a Native American singer-songwriter and musician from San Antonio, Texas, now living in Dawsonville, Georgia. Influenced by the likes of George Strait, Randy Travis, Johnny Cash, and R Carlos Nakai, Littleeagle blends the rich storytelling of Country/Americana music and with the cultural roots of First Nations music, creating a style called NDN Country. LittleEagle is a Native American cultural educator and traditional dancer, having spoken at private events, museums, schools, and colleges throughout the United States. His great respect for his culture and people is evident and represented in a positive way through his music. Ryan tries to utilize his talents to bring awareness to events and issues affecting the indigenous communities in the Americas and other parts of the world. He is truly an ambassador for bridging the gap between the old ways and the new.

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