fbpx
facebook app symbol  twitter  linkedin  instagram 1
 

LOS ANGELES — Taika Waititi, a New Zealand director/actor, accepted the Academy Award last night in the Best Adapted Screenplay category for Jojo Rabbit, and his winner’s speech went beyond your typical “thank yous.” At the 92nd Oscars, held at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, the 44-year thoughtfully recognized not only his mother, producers and film crew, but also Indigenous people around the world.

“I dedicate this to all the indigenous kids in the world who want to do art and dance and write stories," he said in front of Hollywood-industry elites and millions of television viewers. “We are the original storytellers and we can make it here as well.”

Closing his speech, Waititi signed off with “kia ora,” a famous Māori phrase meaning “be safe.” He is the first Oscar winner of Māori decent. Māori are the tangata whenua, the indigenous people, of New Zealand. Later, the heartfelt nods continued when Waititi was introducing the winners of the Academy’s honorary prizes. That’s when he said: “The Academy would like to acknowledge that tonight we have gathered on the ancestral lands of the Tongva, the Tataviam, and the Chumash. We acknowledge them as the first peoples of this land on which the motion pictures community lives and works.” Watch his 2020 Oscar speech here.

Jojo Rabbit stars Roman Griffin Davis, Thomasin McKenzie and Scarlett Johansson. It was nominated for six Oscars, including Best Picture. This was Waititi’s third nomination.  

More Stories Like This

Q&A: Indigenous Actor Joel Montgrand on Season Two of Hit Podcast 'Actors & Ancestors'
Chickasaw Writer Pens First Romantic Comedy 
Here's What's Going in Indian Country, May June 7th — June 13th
Disney+ to Release 2012 Blockbuster 'Avengers' Dubbed in Lakota
Q&A: First Nations Artist Terrance Houle on Honoring Late Mother with Newest Work

Join us in celebrating 100 years of Native citizenship. On June 2, 1924, President Calvin Coolidge signed the Indian Citizenship Act, granting Native Americans US citizenship, a pivotal moment in their quest for equality. This year marks its centennial, inspiring our special project, "Heritage Unbound: Native American Citizenship at 100," celebrating their journey with stories of resilience, struggle, and triumph. Your donations fuel initiatives like these, ensuring our coverage and projects honoring Native American heritage thrive. Your donations fuel initiatives like these, ensuring our coverage and projects honoring Native American heritage thrive.

About The Author
Author: Rich TupicaEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.