Exploring a new relationship is an exciting time, where it might seem like every moment you are learning something new about your partner’s culture, family and beliefs.

While you and your partner might be having fun getting to know each other, it’s important to watch for certain behaviors when dating someone new. In the beginning of a relationship, it’s not always easy to tell if your partner might become abusive.

It can also be hard to spot the early warning signs of abuse because every relationship is different. The one thing most abusive relationships have in common is that the abusive partner will do anything to gain power and control over their partner.

Here are some early “red flags” to look for, but know that these behaviors can appear in a relationship at any time.

Does your partner:

  • Move too fast into the relationship or pressure you to commit?
  • Shower you with compliments or seem “too good to be true”?
  • Constantly ask where you are all the time, or frequently call or text you throughout the day?
  • Follow you around or show up at your home, school or work without telling you in advance?
  • Pressure you to have sex before you’re ready?
  • Act extremely jealous or possessive of you?
  • Make jokes about your culture or put you down for being Native?
  • Lose their temper with you or yell at you in private, but stay calm around others?
  • Insist that you “make more time for them” by spending less time with your family or friends?
  • Encourage you to quit school or work, or to stop participating in activities and hobbies?
  • Insist on driving you everywhere, or check your car mileage when you return?
  • Blame their former partners for abuse in previous relationships (ex. “My ex was crazy,” or “It wasn’t that bad.”)?

Someone who acts in these ways may try to blame their partner for their own abusive behavior. No matter the reason a person chooses to abuse, it is never their partner’s fault.

What You Can Do

Understanding patterns of abuse is a starting point in maintaining healthy relationships. If any of these behaviors raise a red flag for you, you may be in an unhealthy or abusive relationship. To get help, connect with StrongHearts Native Helpline at 1-844-7NATIVE (1-844-762-8483) or by clicking on the Chat Now icon on the website daily from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. CT. As a collaboration with the National Domestic Violence Hotline (The Hotline) and the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, callers reaching out after hours can connect with The Hotline by choosing option one. 

Need help? Contact strongheartshelpline.org today.

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About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online Staff