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A child’s smile can change the world, bringing joy and delight. That’s when you fall hopelessly in love with life. A bright smile is important to a child’s self-esteem. Smiles are not complicated. A perfect smile starts with excellent dental health.

Let’s give that to our children during National Children's Dental Health Month, February. It’s not complicated.

Clean your baby’s mouth as soon as you arrive home from the birth. Breast feed the child if at all possible.  Provide healthy food and water. Healthy teeth start the digestive process. 

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A first visit to a dentist is recommended before age 1 year old.

Baby’s first word will change your world. Teeth are needed for proper speech to develop in the first years.

The most common transmissible disease is dental cavities; the germs which cause cavities are transmitted to the baby by family members. That is why it is essential that all family members have excellent dental health.

Jessica A. Rickert, DDS

The number one reason that children miss school is because of dental disease. Parents, why not do everything in your power to stop dental disease? It’s not complicated. Brush your child’s teeth twice a day. Feed them nutritious food. Take them twice a year to the dentist’s off ice for a dental cleaning twice a year. Included in this visit will be instructions and fluoride applications. If there is a downpour in the day you visit the dentist’s office, you’ll wear a raincoat or use an umbrella, right? That is what sealants are for -sealants on the teeth are protection of the enamel from a harsh environment. They seal out decay.

Take charge ofyour child’s dental health today! Here are free ways to help:

Links to Resourses -Dental Organizations:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/babies-and-kids

National Childrens Dental Health Month | American Dental Association (ada.org)  Full Sets of Fun Activity Sheets-Question? Please email [email protected]

 

Activity Sheets - American Dental Association (mouthhealthy.org)

2021-NCDHM-Infographic.pdf (michigandental.org) - Poster for home & school

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YRGUTCl1KU - Excellent dental health during pregnancy

Children’s Dental Health Month: What You Need to Know About Kids' Oral Health | Smile Michigan-

ADA Watch Your Mouth Presentation (mouthhealthy.org) - Middle school oral health

https://www.deltadental.foundation

Government Health Departments:

Children's Dental Health (cdc.gov) - USA government dental advice

MDHHS_2018_HKD_brochure_Final_634786_7.pdf (michigan.gov) - Dental advice for children

www.education.ne.gov/nebooks/ebooks/powerofrolemodels.pdf  - Recruiting students into dentistry

 

Dental Companies:

Educational Resources (colgate.com) - Dental Activity Sheets

Dental Health for Kids – Children's Health (childrens.com) - Dental Activity Sheets

Free Kids Dental Coloring Sheets - Printable Activity Pages about Teeth (drbethkailes.com) - Dental Activity Sheets

https://www.kidsparkz.com/teeth.html - Dental Activity Sheets

Jessica A. Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) became the first Native American female dentist in July 1975. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan Dental School.

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The Native News Health Desk is made possible by a generous grant from the National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation as well as sponsorship support from RxDestroyer, The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and the American Dental Association. This grant funding and sponsorship support have no effect on editorial consideration in Native News Online.