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The United States during the vote on the Second Article of Impeachment on Wednesday, February 5, 2020. From Facebook

WASHINGTON — The United States Senate voted today to acquit President Donald Trump on the House of Representatives’ two articles of impeachment on Wednesday.

The Senate, with the Republican majority, voted mostly along partisan lines, with the exception of Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah).  Romney, a former presidential candidate voted to guilty on the first article of impeachment, which accused Trump of abuse of power in his dealings with Ukraine. The final vote was 52-48 to acquit on the first article of impeachment.

On the second article of impeachment, which accused Trump of obstruction of Congress, Romney voted not guilty. The final vote to acquit on the second article of impeachment by a vote of 53-47.

The vote to convict would have required two-third majority of the Senate.

Romney said in speech before his Senate colleagues that his decision to vote to convict was the “most difficult decision I have ever faced.”

The Senate acquittal ends the three-week long impeachment trial. While the Senate acquittal allows the president to remain in office, the impeachment by the House of Representatives will forever remain on his record. 

Trump is the third president of the United States to have been impeached.  None have been removed from office.

 

 

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Levi Rickert
Author: Levi RickertEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Levi Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) is the founder, publisher and editor of Native News Online. He can be reached at [email protected]