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WINDOW ROCK, — Ariz. On Monday, the Navajo Department of Health, in coordination with the Navajo Epidemiology Center and the Navajo Area Indian Health Service, reported 70 new COVID-19 positive cases for the Navajo Nation and one more death. The total number of deaths is now 594 as of Monday. Reports indicate that 7,795 individuals have recovered from COVID-19, and 132,720 COVID-19 tests have been administered. The total number of positive COVID-19 cases is now 12,641.

Navajo Nation COVID-19 positive cases by Service Unit:

  • Chinle Service Unit: 2,786
  • Crownpoint Service Unit: 1,358
  • Ft. Defiance Service Unit: 1,280
  • Gallup Service Unit: 1,957
  • Kayenta Service Unit: 1,451
  • Shiprock Service Unit: 1,886
  • Tuba City Service Unit: 1,281
  • Winslow Service Unit: 633

* Nine residences with COVID-19 positive cases are not specific enough to place them accurately in a Service Unit.

The Navajo Nation will have a 56-hour weekend curfew beginning at 9:00 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 13, 2020 until 5:00 a.m. (MST) on Monday, Nov. 16, 2020 due to the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19 in 29 communities on the Navajo Nation. The increase in the uncontrolled spread of COVID-19 in certain communities is largely due to travel off the Navajo Nation and family gatherings. 

On Monday, the state of New Mexico reported a record-high 1,418 new cases of COVID-19, the state of Arizona reported 435 new cases, and Utah reported 2,247. 

“The state of Utah has declared a state of emergency due to the surge of new cases in Utah, and all residents and visitors in Utah are now required to wear a face mask. The data and the scientific evidence show that wearing a mask greatly reduces the chances of contracting COVID-19 and passing the virus to others. We have too many reports of families holding birthday parties, ceremonies, and other family gatherings and not wearing masks and not practicing social distancing – this has to stop in order to help reduce the surge of new cases. Unfortunately, too many of our people are letting their guard down and we are seeing the consequences of it. Stay home as much as possible, wear a mask, avoid family gatherings and large crowds, practice social distancing, and wash your hands often,” said Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez. 

The Nez-Lizer Administration will hold an online town hall on Tuesday, Nov. 10 at 10:00 a.m. (MST) on the Nez-Lizer Facebook page to provide more COVID-19 updates. On Tuesday, the Nez-Lizer Administration and World Central Kitchen will distribute food packages at Black Falls Bible Church in Black Falls at 11:00 a.m. and at Cameron Chapter at 1:00 p.m. (MST). 

All businesses on the Navajo Nation including gas stations, grocery stores, laundromats, and restaurants and food establishments are required to ensure employees and customers wear masks, practice social distancing, disinfect high-touch surfaces, access to hand wash stations, sanitizers and gloves, and limit the number of customers in any enclosed areas. Restaurants and food establishments must operate on a curbside or drive-thru basis only.

For more information, including helpful prevention tips, and resources to help stop the spread of COVID-19, visit the Navajo Department of Health's COVID-19 website: https://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.ndoh.navajo-nsn.gov/COVID-19&source=gmail&ust=1605066350245000&usg=AFQjCNH5rQAwOY5yZPe7TbBy3nvMEWuXKQ">http://www.ndoh.navajo-nsn.gov/COVID-19. For COVID-19 related questions and information, call (928) 871-7014.

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